Darling's banker bashing

Former chancellor attacks the bankers as "arrogant and stupid" in new extracts from his memoir.

More extracts from Alistair Darling's memoir, due out next Wednesday, have leaked onto Labour Uncut, and today we get his view of Fred Goodwin and co. "My worry," writes Darling, "was that they (the bankers) were so arrogant and stupid that they might bring us all down".

The former chancellor reportedly lambasts Goodwin's response to the crisis as that of someone "off to play a game of golf", concluding that the former RBS boss "deserved to be a pariah". Elsewhere, Darling describes Andy Hornby, the former chief executive of HBOS, as "looking like he was about to explode" when confronted with the full scale of what had happened on his watch. According to Labour Uncut's Atul Hatwal, the former chancellor will also attack a lack of gratitude for the bailout that was "as shocking as it was stupid".

What makes Darling's intervention politically notable is that it comes so soon before the publication of the Vickers report on banking. As the Lib Dems fight for the introduction of a strict ring-fence between banks' retail and investment arms, Darling's attack on the avarice of the City won't do their cause any harm.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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