Labour challenges Cameron on his Bullingdon past

The party questions Cameron's claim that he never saw a restaurant smashed up.

As I predicted, David Cameron's flawed defence of his Bullingdon Club past has left him politically exposed. Labour has issued a press release challenging Cameron's questionable claim that he never saw a restaurant smashed up, and urging him to "take responsibility" for what he dismisses as youthful indiscretions.

Here's the full statement from Labour MP John Mann:

David Cameron has questions to answer after his claim today that he did not witness people throwing things through windows or smashing up restaurants during his days as a Bullingdon Club member.

This is very different to what other people remember.

He needs to start admitting what he did and start taking responsibility for what he shrugs off as youthful indiscretions.

If we are to get more responsibility throughout our society following the riots then the Prime Minister should set an example.

No doubt some will dismiss this as more "toff-bashing" from Labour. But unlike Cameron's expensive schooling, the party regards this as legitimate political territory. The key point, they say, is that Cameron chose to join the Bullingdon Club. It provides Ed Miliband, who was more likely to be found reading Fabian pamphlets than smashing restaurant windows, with another opportunity to restate his call for responsibility at the top and the bottom of the society.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.