The public favour disproportionate riot sentences

81 per cent of the public believe the punishments are either "about right" or "too soft".

As the prison sentences handed down to rioters come under attack from the Lib Dems and from some legal professionals, it's worth noting that the public, as ever, take a different view.

A YouGov poll in today's Sun found that 81 per cent believe the punishments are either "about right" (49 per cent) or "too soft" (32 per cent). Asked about the absurd decision to jail Jordan Blackshaw and Perry Sutcliffe-Keenan for four years for (unsuccessfully) inciting disorder on Facebook, 57 per cent said the sentence was "about right", 12 per cent said it was "too soft" and just 25 per cent said it was "too harsh". Then again, given that 33 per cent of the public supported the use of live ammunition on the rioters, the figures aren't as surprising as they may appear.

It's hard to see David Cameron forcing Ken Clarke to sacrifice even more of his justice reforms but the coalition's plan to close 2,500 prisons is increasingly at odds with his "zero tolerance" rhetoric. The Justice Secretary, who has just resumed his holiday, will need all of his political guile to avoid another humiliating U-turn.

In the meantime, it's worth noting that one of the most disproportionate sentences handed down last week - the jailing of a mother for five monthas for accepting a pair of looted shorts - has just been quashed by a judge.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Show Hide image

Michael Gove definitely didn't betray anyone, says Michael Gove

What's a disagreement among friends?

Michael Gove is certainly not a traitor and he thinks Theresa May is absolutely the best leader of the Conservative party.

That's according to the cast out Brexiteer, who told the BBC's World At One life on the back benches has given him the opportunity to reflect on his mistakes. 

He described Boris Johnson, his one-time Leave ally before he decided to run against him for leader, as "phenomenally talented". 

Asked whether he had betrayed Johnson with his surprise leadership bid, Gove protested: "I wouldn't say I stabbed him in the back."

Instead, "while I intially thought Boris was the right person to be Prime Minister", he later came to the conclusion "he wasn't the right person to be Prime Minister at that point".

As for campaigning against the then-PM David Cameron, he declared: "I absolutely reject the idea of betrayal." Instead, it was a "disagreement" among friends: "Disagreement among friends is always painful."

Gove, who up to July had been a government minister since 2010, also found time to praise the person in charge of hiring government ministers, Theresa May. 

He said: "With the benefit of hindsight and the opportunity to spend some time on the backbenches reflecting on some of the mistakes I've made and some of the judgements I've made, I actually think that Theresa is the right leader at the right time. 

"I think that someone who took the position she did during the referendum is very well placed both to unite the party and lead these negotiations effectively."

Gove, who told The Times he was shocked when Cameron resigned after the Brexit vote, had backed Johnson for leader.

However, at the last minute he announced his candidacy, and caused an infuriated Johnson to pull his own campaign. Gove received just 14 per cent of the vote in the final contest, compared to 60.5 per cent for May. 


Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.