The public favour disproportionate riot sentences

81 per cent of the public believe the punishments are either "about right" or "too soft".

As the prison sentences handed down to rioters come under attack from the Lib Dems and from some legal professionals, it's worth noting that the public, as ever, take a different view.

A YouGov poll in today's Sun found that 81 per cent believe the punishments are either "about right" (49 per cent) or "too soft" (32 per cent). Asked about the absurd decision to jail Jordan Blackshaw and Perry Sutcliffe-Keenan for four years for (unsuccessfully) inciting disorder on Facebook, 57 per cent said the sentence was "about right", 12 per cent said it was "too soft" and just 25 per cent said it was "too harsh". Then again, given that 33 per cent of the public supported the use of live ammunition on the rioters, the figures aren't as surprising as they may appear.

It's hard to see David Cameron forcing Ken Clarke to sacrifice even more of his justice reforms but the coalition's plan to close 2,500 prisons is increasingly at odds with his "zero tolerance" rhetoric. The Justice Secretary, who has just resumed his holiday, will need all of his political guile to avoid another humiliating U-turn.

In the meantime, it's worth noting that one of the most disproportionate sentences handed down last week - the jailing of a mother for five monthas for accepting a pair of looted shorts - has just been quashed by a judge.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.