Video: the riots continue for a third night

Incredible footage of last night's riots shows scenes of chaos, clashes and extraordinary bravery.

A bus blazes in Tottenham, where the riots originated. Police on horses charge through the streets in a futile attempt to gain some control over the situation.

 

A West Indian woman from Hackney makes an extraordinary speech in the streets of East London, telling demonstrators: "This is about a fucking man who got shot in Tottenham, this ain't about having fun on the ride and busting up the place. Get it real black people, get real. Do it for a cause, if we're fighting for a cause let's fight for a fucking cause."

 

A powerful video of scenes in Ealing last night, with protesters and police coming head to head in scenes of violent confrontation.

 

Large fires were seen across London in boroughs including Clapham, Croydon, Hackney and Peckham. Helicopter images from Croydon highlight the extent of the chaos as a building burns ferociously.

 

 

Other cities beyond London including Birmingham, Bristol and Liverpool were also affected last night as the riots spread across the country. Here, scenes from Birmingham show shops in the aftermath of a night of looting.

Tess Riley is a freelance journalist and social justice campaigner. She also works, part time, for Streetbank, and can be found on Twitter at @tess_riley

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Forget gaining £350m a week, Brexit would cost the UK £300m a week

Figures from the government's own Office for Budget Responsibility reveal the negative economic impact Brexit would have. 

Even now, there are some who persist in claiming that Boris Johnson's use of the £350m a week figure was accurate. The UK's gross, as opposed to net EU contribution, is precisely this large, they say. Yet this ignores that Britain's annual rebate (which reduced its overall 2016 contribution to £252m a week) is not "returned" by Brussels but, rather, never leaves Britain to begin with. 

Then there is the £4.1bn that the government received from the EU in public funding, and the £1.5bn allocated directly to British organisations. Fine, the Leavers say, the latter could be better managed by the UK after Brexit (with more for the NHS and less for agriculture).

But this entire discussion ignores that EU withdrawal is set to leave the UK with less, rather than more, to spend. As Carl Emmerson, the deputy director of the Institute for Fiscal Studies, notes in a letter in today's Times: "The bigger picture is that the forecast health of the public finances was downgraded by £15bn per year - or almost £300m per week - as a direct result of the Brexit vote. Not only will we not regain control of £350m weekly as a result of Brexit, we are likely to make a net fiscal loss from it. Those are the numbers and forecasts which the government has adopted. It is perhaps surprising that members of the government are suggesting rather different figures."

The Office for Budget Responsibility forecasts, to which Emmerson refers, are shown below (the £15bn figure appearing in the 2020/21 column).

Some on the right contend that a blitz of tax cuts and deregulation following Brexit would unleash  higher growth. But aside from the deleterious economic and social consequences that could result, there is, as I noted yesterday, no majority in parliament or in the country for this course. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.