Tory minister Blunt blunders again

Prisons minister says that the riots were a "one-off" event. How can he be so sure?

The prisons minister, Crispin Blunt, who seems to make a habit of embarrassing the government (he promoted the idea of "prison parties" and suggested that soldiers could be used by probation chiefs as cheap labour), has just left a huge hostage to fortune and described the riots as an "exceptional" event that will lead to a "one-off increase" in the prison population. Given that there is every possibility of further civil unrest, his comments are premature to say the least. As Tom Watson observes, there is now a "newly primed timebomb under his career".

Blunt said that he was "completely confident" that the system could cope but the prison population is now at a record high of 86,654, just 1,439 places below operational capacity, and a recent Ministry of Justice memo warned of outbreaks of violence between rioters and serving prisoners. Two young prisoners, who were arrested after the disorder, were hospitalised last week after a "nasty" assault at Cookham Wood Young Offenders Institution in Kent. As the Prison Reform Trust has warned, parts of the system are "becoming human warehouses, doing little more than banging people up in overcrowded conditions, with regimes that are hard pressed to offer any employment or education."

The coalition still plans to cut more than 2,500 prison places but Blunt declared that there would be places "for all those sent to prison by the courts", adding that "we will continue to do that regardless of how many people are sent to prison." Blunt is almost certain to be moved by Cameron at a future reshuffle, so it will be left to his successor to reconcile this pledge with Ken Clarke's ambitious justice reforms.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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The big problem for the NHS? Local government cuts

Even a U-Turn on planned cuts to the service itself will still leave the NHS under heavy pressure. 

38Degrees has uncovered a series of grisly plans for the NHS over the coming years. Among the highlights: severe cuts to frontline services at the Midland Metropolitan Hospital, including but limited to the closure of its Accident and Emergency department. Elsewhere, one of three hospitals in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland are to be shuttered, while there will be cuts to acute services in Suffolk and North East Essex.

These cuts come despite an additional £8bn annual cash injection into the NHS, characterised as the bare minimum needed by Simon Stevens, the head of NHS England.

The cuts are outlined in draft sustainability and transformation plans (STP) that will be approved in October before kicking off a period of wider consultation.

The problem for the NHS is twofold: although its funding remains ringfenced, healthcare inflation means that in reality, the health service requires above-inflation increases to stand still. But the second, bigger problem aren’t cuts to the NHS but to the rest of government spending, particularly local government cuts.

That has seen more pressure on hospital beds as outpatients who require further non-emergency care have nowhere to go, increasing lifestyle problems as cash-strapped councils either close or increase prices at subsidised local authority gyms, build on green space to make the best out of Britain’s booming property market, and cut other corners to manage the growing backlog of devolved cuts.

All of which means even a bigger supply of cash for the NHS than the £8bn promised at the last election – even the bonanza pledged by Vote Leave in the referendum, in fact – will still find itself disappearing down the cracks left by cuts elsewhere. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.