The Sun ignores Brooks's previous job. . .as editor of the Sun

The <em>Sun</em> describes Rebekah Brooks only as a "former <em>News of the World</em> editor" in it

The Sun has managed to find some space in today's newspaper to report on the Milly Dowler allegations, after practically ignoring the story yesterday. It begins the article boldly:

FORMER News of the World Editor Rebekah Brooks yesterday said she was "sickened" by allegations that a private eye hired by the paper hacked tragic Milly Dowler's phone.

The story neglects to mention that Brooks used to edit another national newspaper too. That newspaper's name? The Sun! Strapped for space, the poor subs at the Sun obviously couldn't fit this extraneous detail in.

The super, soar-away Sun! 

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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.