James Murdoch accused of misleading parliament

"We would like to point out that James Murdoch's recollection of what he was told...was mistaken."

James Murdoch has been accused of misleading MPs by two former News of the World executives.

Colin Myler, who edited the paper until its closure two weeks ago, and Tom Crone, formerly the paper's top lawyer, issued a statement last night saying that Murdoch had been "mistaken" in his evidence.

The disagreement hinges on an email known as the "for Neville" email because its link to the paper's former chief reporter, Neville Thurlbeck, would have blown a hole in News International's defence that phone-hacking was just the work of one rogue reporter, Clive Goodman. The email is thought to be a key factor in News International's decision to pay a settlement of around £700,000 to Gordon Taylor, chief executive of the Professional Footballers Association, when he threatened to sue the paper.

At the select committee on Tuesday, Labour MP Tom Watson asked him about this.

Watson: "When you signed off the Taylor payment, did you see or were you made aware of the full Neville email, the transcript of the hacked voicemail messages?"

Murdoch: "No, I was not aware of that at the time."

He claimed that Myler and Crone hid the email from him. However, their statement contradicts this claim:

Just by way of clarification relating to Tuesday's Culture, Media Select Committee hearing, we would like to point out that James Murdoch's recollection of what he was told when agreeing to settle the Gordon Taylor litigation was mistaken.

In fact, we did inform him of the 'for Neville' email which had been produced to us by Gordon Taylor's lawyers.

So what happens now? John Whittingdale, the chairman of the select committee said that this email was "one of the most critical pieces of evidence in the whole inquiry", and said that MPs would be asking Murdoch to respond and clarify.

However, it is unlikely that this will get very far. Thus far, News Corporation has issued the following statement in response:

James Murdoch stands by his testimony to the select committee.

It is difficult to see circumstances in which this would be revoked, in the absence of concrete evidence that Murdoch saw the email. Wilfully misleading a select committee is not technically a crime as evidence is not given under oath, but it certainly would not look good.

Crone and Myler's intervention is deeply troubling. If their claim is true (and given the large payment to Taylor and his confidentiality agreement, it it certainly not outside the realm of possibility), then at best Murdoch has forgotten evidence of serious criminality at his company, and at worst he has deliberately misled MPs. It is not the first time that News International executives stand accused of doing so.

Parliament is now in recess, making it unlikely that the select committee will hold a special evidence session to clarify the issue, although such a course of action is not unprecedented. One thing we can be certain of is that this story is not disappearing.

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

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Brexit broke my heart - but I'm going to fight for the 16 million who voted Remain

We must accept the voters' decision, but not give up on our beliefs.

The European Community, an institution that we built, that delivered peace, that promoted equality, kept us safe and opened the doors of opportunity, will no longer play part of Britain’s future. As one of the 16 million remain votes and a passionate pro-European the result hurts me deeply.

With this vote, the very fabric of our country has changed, the whole fabric of Europe has been changed.

Even though the vote was close, the majority of British people want us to leave. We must accept that decision but we refuse to give up on our beliefs.

Our optimistic, hopeful, diverse and tolerant Britain is needed now more than ever.

The Liberal Democrats will continue to stand for a better kind of Britain than the one painted by the Leave campaign. Since the polls closed thousands of people have joined our party as they look across at Labour party who dont seem to care. Their spineless leadership has meant we have sleepwalked to Brexit.

As Gladstone said almost 130 years ago – ‘We are part of the community of Europe, and must do our duty as such.’

We must not let this vote allow our country to turn to division, isolation and decline. Our national interest does not end at the cliffs of Dover.

I believe that this vote was not a vote on the European Union alone. It was a collective howl of frustration - at the political class, at big business, at a global elite.

Years of frustration, dissatisfaction and people feeling ignored have been building to this point.  Too often the European Union has been used as a distraction from failures in government.

The pressures on our schools, the pressures on our hospitals and GP surgeries, the pressures on our infrastructure are problems made in Westminster, in our own Parliament, by British politicians.

For the last few weeks I have stood alongside progressives, in Labour, Greens and Conservatives. It felt so much like there was more that united us than divided us.

We must not allow this unity to fade away.

When other parties are divided and wounded, I will reach out. I am proud of the campaign that my party has run, it was positive, energetic and hopeful. That’s the sort of party we are, and that is my offer to the country. It is my offer to all people who share our values.

I can offer you a home for a new modern breed of politics - liberal, hopeful, international, rational - driven by real British values.

Positive about Europe, furious with those who led us to this disaster. Determined that we will not walk away from this fight.

There are 16 million of us saying that this fight is not over. This is our country too. If you are as angry and heartbroken as I am, I need you to join us today.

 

Tim Farron is leader of the Liberal Democrats.