Could Coulson be charged with perjury?

He told the Sheridan trial that he had no "knowledge" of payments to the police.

Speculation is mounting that several arrests will be made in the phone hacking case over the next 24 hours, potentially including that of Andy Coulson. The Evening Standard puts a figure (£100,000) on the unlawful payments the police received from News International. One source tells the paper: "They were running a criminal enterprise at the News of the World. Serious crimes have been found. The question now is about the scalps. There will be high-profile arrests at the paper."

But it's worth noting that if Coulson is ever charged with anything it could be with perjury. During Tommy Sheridan's trial last December, Coulson was memorably asked by Sheridan (who acted as his own counsel): "did the News of the World pay corrupt police officers?" Coulson replied: "Not to my knowledge."

But as became clear on Tuesday night, News International has now passed emails to Scotland Yard showing that Coulson authorised payments to police officers in return for help with stories. Then there's the fact, as I've previously noted, that Coulson admitted in 2003 that payments had been made, although he insisted they were "within the law". A jury of his peers may yet decide otherwise.

The Crown Office has now asked Strathclyde Police to conduct a "preliminary assessment" of witness evidence from the Sheridan trial in light of the latest revelations. Coulson, one senses, is living on borrowed time.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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The section on climate change has already disappeared from the White House website

As soon as Trump was president, the page on climate change started showing an error message.

Melting sea ice, sad photographs of polar bears, scientists' warnings on the Guardian homepage. . . these days, it's hard to avoid the question of climate change. This mole's anxiety levels are rising faster than the sea (and that, unfortunately, is saying something).

But there is one place you can go for a bit of respite: the White House website.

Now that Donald Trump is president of the United States, we can all scroll through the online home of the highest office in the land without any niggling worries about that troublesome old man-made existential threat. That's because the minute that Trump finished his inauguration speech, the White House website's page about climate change went offline.

Here's what the page looked like on January 1st:

And here's what it looks like now that Donald Trump is president:

The perfect summary of Trump's attitude to global warming.

Now, the only references to climate on the website is Trump's promise to repeal "burdensome regulations on our energy industry", such as, er. . . the Climate Action Plan.

This mole tries to avoid dramatics, but really: are we all doomed?

I'm a mole, innit.