Chávez reveals cancer treatment

"I neglected my health," says the Venezuelan president.

After weeks of speculation over the state of his health, Hugo Chávez has revealed that he has had surgery to remove a cancerous tumour. In his first video appearance since being hospitalised in Cuba, Chávez said doctors had removed "cancerous cells" from his body. "This [is] the new battle that life has placed before us," he said.

In an uncharacteristically short speech, he ruefully reflected, "I neglected my health and I was reluctant to have medical check ups. It was a fundamental mistake for a revolutionary."

The Venezuelan president was rushed to hospital on 10 June after suffering abdominal pain while in a meeting with Fidel Castro. He later underwent emergency pelvic surgery and, as we now know, a second operation to remove a tumour.

It's still unclear when Chávez will return to Venezuela and the news has dismayed his supporters, who were confident that he would win re-election next year. The opposition is arguing that it is unconstitutional for Chávez to govern the country from abroad. Others have criticised him for initially denying claims that he had been diagnosed with cancer.

But most importantly, as I wrote on Monday, Chávez's absence has highlighted the lack of any obvious successor to his Bolivarian Revolution. Aware of this fact, his supporters are discussing the possibility of a Castro-like succession which would see Chavez's older brother, Adán Chávez, take over the presidency. As today's New York Times notes: "no government figure has occupied the political void created by [Chávez's] absence more assertively than his older brother, Adán Chávez, a physicist whose radical thinking has often been to the left of the president's."

In the meantime, Venezuelan politics remains as polarised as ever. On Saturday, the Vice Foreign Minister, Temir Porras, said: "The only thing that has metastasized is the cancer of the Miami Herald and the rest of the right-wing media."

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Show Hide image

New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.