Belfast riots: in pictures

The city saw a second night of rioting last night as the Ulster loyalist marching season reaches its

Above, Orangemen march past a Nationalist area at the start of yesterday's 12th July celebrations in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

Orangemen parade

Serious rioting erupted last night in the Ardoyne area of north Belfast. The trouble broke out after police in riot gear took up position ahead of an Orange parade walking past the Ardoyne shops on Tuesday evening and spread across the city.

Belfast rioting

Here, police try to break into a burning car. Unionists insist that the violence had nothing to do with the parade, but was caused by militant Republicans protesting against it.

Belfast riot bonfire

Children play around a bonfire lit in the shadow of the a shipyard to celebrate the beginning of the 12th July celebration.

Belfast riot police

Stones, bottles and fireworks were thrown at police. Water cannon was used to push back the crowd of about 200 people.

Belfast riot police

According to police, a number of officers were injured. Police also fired a number of plastic bullets and a photographer was hit.

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

Getty
Show Hide image

Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

0800 7318496