Belfast riots: in pictures

The city saw a second night of rioting last night as the Ulster loyalist marching season reaches its

Above, Orangemen march past a Nationalist area at the start of yesterday's 12th July celebrations in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

Orangemen parade

Serious rioting erupted last night in the Ardoyne area of north Belfast. The trouble broke out after police in riot gear took up position ahead of an Orange parade walking past the Ardoyne shops on Tuesday evening and spread across the city.

Belfast rioting

Here, police try to break into a burning car. Unionists insist that the violence had nothing to do with the parade, but was caused by militant Republicans protesting against it.

Belfast riot bonfire

Children play around a bonfire lit in the shadow of the a shipyard to celebrate the beginning of the 12th July celebration.

Belfast riot police

Stones, bottles and fireworks were thrown at police. Water cannon was used to push back the crowd of about 200 people.

Belfast riot police

According to police, a number of officers were injured. Police also fired a number of plastic bullets and a photographer was hit.

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

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En français, s'il vous plaît! EU lead negotiator wants to talk Brexit in French

C'est très difficile. 

In November 2015, after the Paris attacks, Theresa May said: "Nous sommes solidaires avec vous, nous sommes tous ensemble." ("We are in solidarity with you, we are all together.")

But now the Prime Minister might have to brush up her French and take it to a much higher level.

Reuters reports the EU's lead Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, would like to hold the talks in French, not English (an EU spokeswoman said no official language had been agreed). 

As for the Home office? Aucun commentaire.

But on Twitter, British social media users are finding it all très amusant.

In the UK, foreign language teaching has suffered from years of neglect. The government may regret this now . . .

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.