Vancouver 'riot kiss' photo: details emerge

The image of a couple in a passionate clinch as a riot rages around them was not all it seems.

The image above appears to show a couple lying on the street locked in a passionate kiss as the Vancouver hockey riots raged around them. Taken by Canada-based photojournalist Richard Lam, the photo quickly went viral ans was carried on news sites around the world.

The couple's identity was not known. Lam said that he couldn't tell whether they were kissing, or if one of them was hurt. "I keep looking at the picture but I don't know what I think anymore," he said.

Now it looks as though the less romantic option may be true. An eyewitness, William, contacted the Vancouver Sun. He said thatthe couple were knocked over by two riot police: "The girl who was knocked over landed head first on the pavement with her boyfriend landed partially on top of her. She was in visible pain, crying, but the two officers gave them a parting shove and moved on. Bystanders went to make sure she was OK."

Several readers sent in another version of the photo, which shows the couple from another angle, appears to corroborate this.

An Australian news website, NineMSN, claims to have identified the man in the photograph as Scott Jones, a 29 year old Australian who has been living and working in Vancouver for six months. It identifies the woman as Alex Thomas, a Canadian. According to the report, lots of his friends had posted on his Facebook wall about the story, and he replied: "Classic! This was shortly after the riot police run over the top of us and naturally Alex needed some comforting."

Officials in Vancouver said almost 150 people required hospital treatment and almost 100 were arrested during the riot.

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty
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Why Ukip might not be dead just yet

Nigel Farage's party might have a second act in it. 

Remember Ukip? Their former leader Nigel Farage is carving out a living as a radio shock jock and part-time film critic. The party is currently midway through a leadership election to replace Paul Nuttall, who quit his post following their disastrous showing at the general election.

They are already facing increasing financial pressure thanks to the loss of short money and, now they no longer have any MPs, their parliamentary office in Westminster, too. There may be bigger blows to come. In March 2019, their 24 MEPs will all lose their posts when Britain leaves the European Union, denying another source of funding. In May 2021, if Ukip’s disastrous showing in the general election is echoed in the Welsh Assembly, the last significant group of full-time Ukip politicians will lose their seats.

To make matters worse, the party could be badly split if Anne-Marie Waters, the founder of Sharia Watch, is elected leader, as many of the party’s MEPs have vowed to quit if she wins or is appointed deputy leader by the expected winner, Peter Whittle.

Yet when you talk to Ukip officials or politicians, they aren’t despairing, yet. 

Because paradoxically, they agree with Remainers: Theresa May’s Brexit deal will disappoint. Any deal including a "divorce bill" – which any deal will include – will fall short of May's rhetoric at the start of negotiations. "People are willing to have a little turbulence," says one senior figure about any economic fallout, "but not if you tell them you haven't. We saw that with Brown and the end of boom and bust. That'll be where the government is in March 2019."

They believe if Ukip can survive as a going concern until March 2019, then they will be well-placed for a revival. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.