Tories less trusted than Labour on the NHS

Labour is the party trusted to run the most NHS effectively, according to a New Statesman/ICD poll.

David Cameron worked hard in opposition to convince the public that the Tories could be trusted with the NHS. He promised to protect the health service from cuts and, infamously, pledged to "stop the top-down reorganisations of the NHS" (before embarking on the largest top-down reorganisation since Nye Bevan founded the service).

He even declared that while it took Tony Blair three words to sum up his priorities for government ("Education, education, education"), he could do it in three letters: "N-H-S". Cameron was determined to ensure that the Conservatives would never fight another election from behind on the NHS. But Andrew Lansley's chaotic reforms mean that much of his work has been undone. The latest New Statesman/ICD poll shows that the Tories are now less trusted than Labour to run the NHS effectively.

27 per cent of respondents said that Labour is the party they trust to run the health service most effectively, compared to 23 per cent who said the Conservatives and 7 per cent who said the Liberal Democrats. However, 26 per cent said that they trust no party to run the NHS effectively.

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In yet another speech on the NHS today, Cameron will offer "five guarantees" on the health service. The PM will pledge to maintain a universal service, to increase spending, not to privatise the NHS, to keep waiting times low and to keep care integrated. But whether the public are in any mood to listen is another matter.

In the meantime, Cameron has come under attack from his party's right flank. Tory backbencher Nick de Bois, one of Andrew Lansley's most energetic defenders, has vowed to vote against the bill unless it preserves the principle of competition.

This exclusive poll for the New Statesman was carried out by ICD Research, powered by ID Factor, from 4-5 June 2011 and is based on a sample of 1,000 responses.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.