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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Left and libertarian right cohabit in the weird world of the genocide belittlers (Guardian)

Many on the left are determined to dismiss the genocides in Bosnia and Rwanda, writes George Monbiot.

2. Why peace-loving Ed Miliband would be better off picking a few fights (Daily Telegraph)

Fear of repeating the TB-GBs has led the Labour leader to seek unity at any price, says Mary Riddell.

3. Tell us why it was worth stabbing your brother (Times) (£)

In the TV age voters see leaders through images, writes Rachel Sylvester. Ed Miliband is a blank screen desperately in need of definition.

4. Why Syria will get away with it (Financial Times)

A 20-year experiment with the idea that western military force can put the world to rights is coming to a close, says Gideon Rachman.

5. NHS shakeup review leaves big questions unanswered (Guardian)

Critical issues such as how to ensure quality of care and stop private hospitals cherry-picking patients are ignored in the report, says Christina McAnea.

6. I'm sorry, but there's precious little about Mr Cameron's government that's visibly Conservative (Daily Mail)

Cameron becomes strangely timid when important domestic reforms meet entrenched opposition, notes Stephen Glover.

7. Labour must own its past to build its future (Financial Times)

Anything interesting that Ed Miliband's party might have to say is drowned out by introspection and infighting, writes Philip Stephens.

8. NHS reforms: The Government is turning the clock back (Daily Telegraph)

David Cameron is going back on Kenneth Clarke's health reforms of 1991, writes Andrew Haldenby.

9. While the PM and his deputy jockey for credit, Labour is the real winner (Independent)

The amended health bill may not necessarily cure the coalition parties' ills, says Andrew Grice.

10. The debris of dodgy data (Guardian)

Too many journalists take the claims of politicians at face value instead of examining the statistics, writes Mark Damazer.