Are these the 200 primary schools destined to become academies?

Michael Gove promises to turn worst-performing primary schools into academies.

The government announced today that it will be conducting an overhaul of the nation's primary schools by transforming the 200 worst performing institutions into academies. Although the Department for Education has not yet released a list of affected schools, parents will no doubt be wondering whether their own children's education will be affected by changes.

The New Statesman can confirm that the criteria for assessing the "worst" schools are as follows:

1. Schools that have fewer than 60 per cent of pupils attaining level 4 or above in English and Maths at Key Stage 2 (SATs exams)

2. Schools that have a lower than average progression level for pupipils between Key Stages 1 and 2

Primary schools that have consistently fallen below average on both of these criteria for the past five years are thus likely to be affected by the new changes. The final figure may not be exactly 200 schools, the DfE have said, but the number is likely to be within that region.

Using data collated by the BBC for the academic year 2009-2010, here are 197 that would be categorised as "worst" by these criteria. Of course, things could change between now and the decision being taken. The list is by local authority:

The list is as follows:

Local Authority Name of School
Barnsley
Bedford
Birmingham
Birmingham
Birmingham
Birmingham
Birmingham
Birmingham
Birmingham
Birmingham
Blackpool
Bolton
Bradford
Bristol, City of
Bristol, City of
Bristol, City of
Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
Bury
Cambridgeshire
Cambridgeshire
Cambridgeshire
Cheshire East
Cheshire West
Cornwall
Cornwall
Cornwall
Cornwall
Croydon
Cumbria
Cumbria
Derby
Derbyshire
Derbyshire
Derbyshire
Devon
Devon
Doncaster
Dudley
Durham
Ealing
East Riding
Enfield
Essex
Essex
Essex
Essex
Essex
Essex
Essex
Essex
Essex
Gateshead
Gateshead
Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire
Halton
Halton
Hampshire
Hampshire
Hampshire
Hampshire
Hampshire
Herefordshire
Hertfordshire
Hertfordshire
Isle of Wight
Kent
Kent
Kent
Kent
Kent
Kent
Kent
Kent
Kent
Kent
Kent
Kent
Kent
Kent
Kent
Kent
Kent
Kent
Kent
Kent
Kingston upon Hull
Kingston upon Hull
Kingston upon Hull
Kingston upon Hull
Kirklees
Knowsley
Lancashire
Lancashire
Leeds
Leeds
Leicester
Leicester
Leicestershire
Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
Liverpool
Liverpool
Luton
Manchester
Medway
Medway
Newcastle Tyne
Newcastle Tyne
Norfolk
Norfolk
Norfolk
Norfolk
Norfolk
Norfolk
Norfolk
Norfolk
Norfolk
North Lincolnshire
North Somerset
North Somerset
Northamptonshire
Northamptonshire
Northamptonshire
Northamptonshire
Northamptonshire
Northamptonshire
Northumberland
Nottingham
Nottingham
Nottingham
Nottinghamshire
Nottinghamshire
Nottinghamshire
Nottinghamshire
Oldham
Oxfordshire
Peterborough
Plymouth
Portsmouth
Rochdale
Rotherham
Rotherham
Rotherham
Sandwell
Sandwell
Sheffield
Shropshire
Somerset
Southampton
Southwark
Southwark
Staffordshire
Staffordshire
Staffordshire
Staffordshire
Staffordshire
Staffordshire
Suffolk
Suffolk
Suffolk
Suffolk
Sunderland
Surrey
Surrey
Swindon
Tameside
Telford and Wrekin
Thurrock
Wakefield
Walsall
Walsall
Wandsworth
Warwickshire
Warwickshire
Warwickshire
West Berkshire
West Sussex
Wiltshire
Wiltshire
Wiltshire
Wiltshire
Wiltshire
Wiltshire
Wiltshire
Wirral
Wirral
Wolverhampton
Worcestershire
Worcestershire
Worcestershire
Worcestershire
Darfield, All Saints, CofE Primary School
Abbey Middle School
St Clement's CofE Primary School
Brookfields Primary School
Primrose Hill Community School
Hawkesley CofE/Methodist Primary School
Bordesley Village Primary School
St George's CofE Junior and Infant School
Erdington Hall Primary School
Foundry Primary School
Christ The King Catholic Primary School
Queensbridge Primary School
St Oswald's CofE Primary School
Glenfrome Primary School
Oldbury Court Primary School
Ilminster Avenue Primary School
The Meadows School
Oak Green School
Bell Lane Combined School
St John's CofE Primary School, Radcliffe
The Round House Primary School
Guyhirn CofE VC Primary School
Orchards CofE Primary School
Underwood West Primary School
The Acorns Primary & Nursery School
Tregolls School
St Tudy CofE VA Primary School
Mevagissey Community Primary School
Ladock CofE School
Ecclesbourne Primary School
Petteril Bank School
St Cuthbert's Catholic School and Nursery
Boulton Primary School
Gamesley Community Primary School
Anthony Bek Community Primary School
Palterton Primary School
Bearnes Voluntary Primary School
Ashleigh CofE (VC) Primary School
Marshland Primary School
Thorns Primary School
Woodhouse Community Primary School
Petts Hill Primary School
Hornsea Burton Primary School
Starks Field Primary School
Ravenscroft Primary School
Alton Park Junior School
Harlowbury Primary School
John Bunyan Junior School
Melbourne Park Primary & Nursery
Milwards Primary School & Nursery
Wix and Wrabness Primary School
Little Parndon Primary School
Potter Street Primary School
Marley Hill Community Primary School
Blaydon West Primary School
Whitminster Endowed CofE School
Offa's Mead Primary School
Watermoor CofE Primary School
Parliament Primary School
St Augustine's Catholic Primary School
The Holy Spirit Catholic Primary School
Woodcroft Primary
Beaumont Junior School
Siskin Junior School
Romsey Primary School
Trosnant Junior School and BESD
Burley Gate CofE Primary School
Yewtree Primary School
Brockswood Primary School
Downside Middle School
Northdown Primary School
Rosherville CofE Primary School
Horizon Primary School
Greenfields Community Primary School
West Malling CofE VC Primary School
Linden Grove Primary School
Fordcombe CofE Primary School
Pilgrims' Way Primary School & Nursery
Castle Hill Community Primary School
Kingswood Primary School
Chantry Primary School
Molehill Copse Primary School
Hersden Community Primary School
Milton Court Primary School
Salmestone Primary School
Sherwood Park Primary School
Kingsmead Primary School
St James the Great Primary & Nursery
Bell Wood Community Primary School
Diocesan & Payne Smith CofE School
Hall Road Primary School
Newington Primary School
Foredyke Primary School
Griffin Primary School
Mount Pleasant Junior School
Greengates Community Primary
Weeton Primary School
Cherry Fold Community Primary
Grimes Dyke Primary School
Parklands Primary School
The Samworth Enterprise Academy
Mowmacre Hill Primary School
Thorpe Acre Junior School
The North Cotes CofE Primary School
The Mareham-le-Fen CofE School
Theddlethorpe Primary School
Phoenix Primary School
All Saints' Catholic Primary School
St Matthew's Primary School
Victoria Avenue Community Primary School
Luton Junior School
Stoke Community School
Walbottle Village Primary School
St George's RC Primary School
Hockwold Primary School
Cawston VC Primary School
The Bishops CofE Primary School
Peterhouse Primary School
Greenacre Primary & Nursery School
Upwell Community Primary School
Southery Primary School
Larkman Primary School
Thetford Queensway Community School
Parkwood Primary School
Court-de-Wyck Primary School
Oldmixon Primary School
Lumbertubs Primary School
Hazel Leys Nursery & Primary School
Southbrook Junior School
Lings Primary School
Earl Spencer Primary School
Grange Community School
Bedlingtonshire Junior High School
Rosslyn Park Primary & Nursery School
Westglade Primary School
Bulwell St Mary's Primary School
Brinsley Primary and Nursery School
St Patrick's Catholic Primary School
Church Vale Primary School
St Swithun's CofE Primary School
Stoneleigh Primary School
Tower Hill Community Primary School
Woodston Primary School
Mayflower Community School
Paulsgrove Primary School
St Margaret's CofE Primary School
Dinnington Community Primary School
Dalton Foljambe Primary School
West Melton Junior and Infant School
Hateley Heath Primary School
Cape Primary School
Prince Edward Primary School
The Martin Wilson School
Cossington Primary School
Heathfield Junior School
Gloucester School
Crawford Primary School
Churchfield CofE Primary School
Chesterton Primary School
Amington Heath Community School
Dove Bank Primary School
Longwood Primary School
Western Springs Primary School
Kingsfleet Primary School
Sandlings Primary School
Whitton Community Primary School
Langer Primary School
Academy 360
Leatherhead Trinity School
Stepgates Community School
Mountford Manor Primary School
Wild Bank Community School
Millbrook Primary School
Lansdowne Primary School
Newlands Primary School
County Bridge Primary School
Harden Primary School
Southmead Primary School
Wood End Primary School
Oakfield Primary School
All Saints CofE Primary School
The Willows Primary School
Seal Primary School, Selsey
Princecroft Primary School
Kings Park Primary School
Studley Green Primary School
The Manor CofE VC Primary School
St John's CofE School
Wilton and Barford CofE Primary
Salisbury, Manor Fields Primary
Fender Primary School
St Joseph's Catholic Primary School
Graiseley Primary School
Perry Wood Primary and Nursery
Sutton Park Community Primary
Gorse Hill Community Primary
Dines Green Primary School

Emanuelle Degli Esposti is the editor and founder of The Arab Review, an online journal covering arts and culture in the Arab world. She also works as a freelance journalist specialising in the politics of the Middle East.

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David Osland: “Corbyn is actually Labour’s only chance”

The veteran Labour activist on the release of his new pamphlet, How to Select or Reselect Your MP, which lays out the current Labour party rules for reselecting an MP.

Veteran left-wing Labour activist David Osland, a member of the national committee of the Labour Representation Committee and a former news editor of left magazine Tribune, has written a pamphlet intended for Labour members, explaining how the process of selecting Labour MPs works.

Published by Spokesman Books next week (advance copies are available at Nottingham’s Five Leaves bookshop), the short guide, entitled “How to Select or Reselect Your MP”, is entertaining and well-written, and its introduction, which goes into reasoning for selecting a new MP and some strategy, as well as its historical appendix, make it interesting reading even for those who are not members of the Labour party. Although I am a constituency Labour party secretary (writing here in an expressly personal capacity), I am still learning the Party’s complex rulebook; I passed this new guide to a local rules-boffin member, who is an avowed Owen Smith supporter, to evaluate whether its description of procedures is accurate. “It’s actually quite a useful pamphlet,” he said, although he had a few minor quibbles.

Osland, who calls himself a “strong, but not uncritical” Corbyn supporter, carefully admonishes readers not to embark on a campaign of mass deselections, but to get involved and active in their local branches, and to think carefully about Labour’s election fortunes; safe seats might be better candidates for a reselection campaign than Labour marginals. After a weak performance by Owen Smith in last night’s Glasgow debate and a call for Jeremy Corbyn to toughen up against opponents by ex Norwich MP Ian Gibson, an old ally, this pamphlet – named after a 1981 work by ex-Tribune editor Chris Mullin, who would later go on to be a junior minister under Blai – seems incredibly timely.

I spoke to Osland on the telephone yesterday.

Why did you decide to put this pamphlet together now?

I think it’s certainly an idea that’s circulating in the Labour left, after the experience with Corbyn as leader, and the reaction of the right. It’s a debate that people have hinted at; people like Rhea Wolfson have said that we need to be having a conversation about it, and I’d like to kickstart that conversation here.

For me personally it’s been a lifelong fascination – I was politically formed in the early Eighties, when mandatory reselection was Bennite orthodoxy and I’ve never personally altered my belief in that. I accept that the situation has changed, so what the Labour left is calling for at the moment, so I see this as a sensible contribution to the debate.

I wonder why selection and reselection are such an important focus? One could ask, isn’t it better to meet with sitting MPs and see if one can persuade them?

I’m not calling for the “deselect this person, deselect that person” rhetoric that you sometimes see on Twitter; you shouldn’t deselect an MP purely because they disagree with Corbyn, in a fair-minded way, but it’s fair to ask what are guys who are found to be be beating their wives or crossing picket lines doing sitting as our MPs? Where Labour MPs publicly have threatened to leave the party, as some have been doing, perhaps they don’t value their Labour involvement.

So to you it’s very much not a broad tool, but a tool to be used a specific way, such as when an MP has engaged in misconduct?

I think you do have to take it case by case. It would be silly to deselect the lot, as some people argue.

In terms of bringing the party to the left, or reforming party democracy, what role do you think reselection plays?

It’s a basic matter of accountability, isn’t it? People are standing as Labour candidates – they should have the confidence and backing of their constituency parties.

Do you think what it means to be a Labour member has changed since Corbyn?

Of course the Labour party has changed in the past year, as anyone who was around in the Blair, Brown, Miliband era will tell you. It’s a completely transformed party.

Will there be a strong reaction to the release of this pamphlet from Corbyn’s opponents?

Because the main aim is to set out the rules as they stand, I don’t see how there can be – if you want to use the rules, this is how to go about it. I explicitly spelled out that it’s a level playing field – if your Corbyn supporting MP doesn’t meet the expectations of the constituency party, then she or he is just as subject to a challenge.

What do you think of the new spate of suspensions and exclusions of some people who have just joined the party, and of other people, including Ronnie Draper, the General Secretary of the Bakers’ Union, who have been around for many years?

It’s clear that the Labour party machinery is playing hardball in this election, right from the start, with the freeze date and in the way they set up the registered supporters scheme, with the £25 buy in – they’re doing everything they can to influence this election unfairly. Whether they will succeed is an open question – they will if they can get away with it.

I’ve been seeing comments on social media from people who seem quite disheartened on the Corbyn side, who feel that there’s a chance that Smith might win through a war of attrition.

Looks like a Corbyn win to me, but the gerrymandering is so extensive that a Smith win isn’t ruled out.

You’ve been in the party for quite a few years, do you think there are echoes of past events, like the push for Bennite candidates and the takeover from Foot by Kinnock?

I was around last time – it was dirty and nasty at times. Despite the narrative being put out by the Labour right that it was all about Militant bully boys and intimidation by the left, my experience as a young Bennite in Tower Hamlets Labour Party, a very old traditional right wing Labour party, the intimidation was going the other way. It was an ugly time – physical threats, people shaping up to each other at meetings. It was nasty. Its nasty in a different way now, in a social media way. Can you compare the two? Some foul things happened in that time – perhaps worse in terms of physical intimidation – but you didn’t have the social media.

There are people who say the Labour Party is poised for a split – here in Plymouth (where we don’t have a Labour MP), I’m seeing comments from both sides that emphasise that after this leadership election we need to unite to fight the Tories. What do you think will happen?

I really hope a split can be avoided, but we’re a long way down the road towards a split. The sheer extent of the bad blood – the fact that the right have been openly talking about it – a number of newspaper articles about them lining up backing from wealthy donors, operating separately as a parliamentary group, then they pretend that butter wouldn’t melt in their mouths, and that they’re not talking about a split. Of course they are. Can we stop the kamikazes from doing what they’re plotting to do? I don’t know, I hope so.

How would we stop them?

We can’t, can we? If they have the financial backing, if they lose this leadership contest, there’s no doubt that some will try. I’m old enough to remember the launch of the SDP, let’s not rule it out happening again.

We’ve talked mostly about the membership. But is Corbynism a strategy to win elections?

With the new electoral registration rules already introduced, the coming boundary changes, and the loss of Scotland thanks to decades of New Labour neglect, it will be uphill struggle for Labour to win in 2020 or whenever the next election is, under any leadership.

I still think Corbyn is Labour’s best chance. Any form of continuity leadership from the past would see the Midlands and north fall to Ukip in the same way Scotland fell to the SNP. Corbyn is actually Labour’s only chance.

Margaret Corvid is a writer, activist and professional dominatrix living in the south west.