Top Ten Christian Blogs

The Staggers presents its list of top ten Christian blogs from around the world.

To herald the news that Rowan Williams, Archbishop of Canterbury, guest edited this week's New Statesman magazine, The Staggers has compiled a list of the top Christian blogs from around the world that offer commentary, advice and analysis about Christianity.

And they are:

1. The Church Mouse Blog - The Church mouse sees and hears all, but being a mouse, he can't speak. So he blogs.

2. What Does The Prayer Really Say? - Blog of U.S cleric Fr. John Zuhlsdorf.

3. The Hermeneutic of Continuity - Personal blog of Fr. Tim Finnigan, Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Southwark.

4. The Twurch of England - Twitter aggregate of the Church of England.

5. The Gospel Coalition - fellowship of US evangelical Churches.

6. The Resurgence - US based website seeking to popularise the Christian religion.

7. Archbishop Cranmer - Right-wing blogger pontificates on moral matters.

8. Desiring God - Blog of US pastor John Piper.

9. Next Gener.Asian Church - American Asian Christians blogging about culture and religion.

10. Missionary Blogs - A collection of blogs from around the world.

N. B. The list is not exhaustive, but gives a flavour of what sort of online resources are out there for the global Christian community.

Emanuelle Degli Esposti is the editor and founder of The Arab Review, an online journal covering arts and culture in the Arab world. She also works as a freelance journalist specialising in the politics of the Middle East.

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Could Jeremy Corbyn still be excluded from the leadership race? The High Court will rule today

Labour donor Michael Foster has applied for a judgement. 

If you thought Labour's National Executive Committee's decision to let Jeremy Corbyn automatically run again for leader was the end of it, think again. 

Today, the High Court will decide whether the NEC made the right judgement - or if Corbyn should have been forced to seek nominations from 51 MPs, which would effectively block him from the ballot.

The legal challenge is brought by Michael Foster, a Labour donor and former parliamentary candidate. Corbyn is listed as one of the defendants.

Before the NEC decision, both Corbyn's team and the rebel MPs sought legal advice.

Foster has maintained he is simply seeking the views of experts. 

Nevertheless, he has clashed with Corbyn before. He heckled the Labour leader, whose party has been racked with anti-Semitism scandals, at a Labour Friends of Israel event in September 2015, where he demanded: "Say the word Israel."

But should the judge decide in favour of Foster, would the Labour leadership challenge really be over?

Dr Peter Catterall, a reader in history at Westminster University and a specialist in opposition studies, doesn't think so. He said: "The Labour party is a private institution, so unless they are actually breaking the law, it seems to me it is about how you interpret the rules of the party."

Corbyn's bid to be personally mentioned on the ballot paper was a smart move, he said, and the High Court's decision is unlikely to heal wounds.

 "You have to ask yourself, what is the point of doing this? What does success look like?" he said. "Will it simply reinforce the idea that Mr Corbyn is being made a martyr by people who are out to get him?"