The New Statesman’s rolling politics blog

RSS

5 May elections: the results so far

Follow the winners and losers from elections across the UK on our live blog.

Click refresh – F5 if you are using a PC – to update this page.

The AV referendum

5.55pm It's over. Well, according to Danny Alexander it is. "I accept that we're going to lose, quite handsomely," said Alexander, according to the Daily Telegraph's James Kirkup on Twitter.

5.48pm The Yes campaign has just broken the half-a-million votes barrier. Unfortunately, the No camp passed that barrier an hour ago and has now received over 1.2m votes.

5.46pm Results from the AV referendum are pouring in and they do not look good for the Yes camp. With 48 of 440 districts declared, the No camp is leading, 70.2 per cent to 29.8 per cent.

Turnout for the referendum was low across the country, with only Scotland being the only region to enjoy a turnout of more than 50 per cent.

Scottish Parliament

5.25pm Final results underlining the fact that the SNP will form Scotland's first ever majority government. Labour and the Liberal Democrats both suffered heavy losses, losing seven and 12 seats respectively. Here are the results:

  • SNP | 69 MSPs (+23)
  • Labour | 37 MSPs (-7)
  • Conservatives | 15 MSPs (-5)
  • Liberal Democrats | 5 MSPs (-12)
  • Others 3 MSPs (+1)

Who was voting and for what?
People who live in Scotland voted to elect members of the Scottish Parliament (MSPs). There are 129 elected MSPs.

Which voting system was used?
Scotland uses a mixed member proportional representation (MMS) system, a form of the additional member method of proportional representation. Under the system, voters were given two votes: one for a specific candidate and one for a political party. Thus, 73 of the 129 MSPs are constituency members, meaning they represent one constituency in the Scottish Parliament. The other 56 are regional members, meaning they represent one of the eight electoral regions of Scotland. Each electoral region includes a number of constituencies. So voters are represented by eight MPs – one for the their constituency, and seven for their region.

 

National Assembly for Wales

Result
The final result is now in and Labour has fallen one short of an overall majority, finishing with 30 out of the 60 Assembly members seats available. The party gained four seats, Plaid Cymru lost four, the Conservatives finished up one and the Liberal Democrats down one.

  • Labour | 28 seats | 2 regional AMs (+4)
  • Conservatives | 6 seats | 8 regional AMs (+2)
  • Plaid Cymru | 5 seats | 6 regional AMs (-4)
  • Liberal Democrats | 1 seat | 4 regional AMs (-1)
  • Others | 0 seats | 0 regional AMs (-1)

Who was voting and for what?
People who live in Wales voted to elect Assembly members (AMs). There are 60 elected AMs.

Which voting system was used?
The Welsh Assembly uses the same system as the Scottish elections. There are 40 constituency members, and the other 20 are regional members who represent one of the five electoral regions of Wales. Therefore, if you live in Wales, you are represented by five AMs – one for your Assembly constituency and four more representing your region.

 

Local elections in England

Results so far
At
5.31pm (243 of 279 councils declared)

  • Labour | 54 councils (+24) | 2,136 councillors (+715)
  • Conservatives | 131 councils (+5) | 4,012 councillors (+62)
  • Liberal Democrats | 8 councils (-9) | 909 councillors (-606)
  • Others | 49 councils (-20) | 599 councillors (-185)

Who was voting and for what?
More than 9,500 seats in 279 councils across England were contested. Among the 36 metropolitan councils electing a third of their seats are Birmingham, Manchester, Liverpool and Sheffield. In addition, elections were held in 49 unitary authorities and 194 district councils.

Which voting system was used?
Local elections in England use first-past-the-post.

AV referendum

Results so far
Counting will not start until Friday afternoon with a result not expected until around 9pm. We should know the turnout, courtesy of the Electoral Commission, before 3pm.

Who was voting and for what?
Everyone in the UK was able to vote in the referendum on the system we use to elect MPs to the House of Commons.

Which voting system was used?
The question posed was: "At present, the UK uses the 'first past the post' system to elect MPs to the House of Commons. Should the 'Alternative Vote' system be used instead?" It's a simple Yes or No vote – technically first-past-the-post, as whichever side gets the most votes will win.

Northern Ireland Assembly and local elections

Results so far
Counting was due to start at 8am on Friday.

Who was voting and for what?
People in Northern Ireland are electing 108 members of the legislative assembly (MLAs) to the Northern Ireland Assembly. Voters will also elect 582 councillors to the 26 local councils across the region.

Which voting system was used?
Members are elected under the single transferable vote (STV) system of proportional representation. Under STV, an elector's vote is initially allocated to his or her most preferred candidate, and then, after candidates have been either elected or eliminated, any surplus or unused votes are transferred according to the voter's stated preferences. The Assembly is based on the principle of power-sharing to ensure that both unionist and nationalist communities participate in governing the region.

 

Leicester South by-election

Results so far
Counting was due to begin at 7.30am on Friday.

Who was voting and for what?
People in the Leicester South constituency were voting for a new MP after Sir Peter Soulsby, their Labour MP, stood down from parliament to contest the first election for Mayor of Leicester.

Which voting system was used?
First-past-the-post.

Click refresh – F5 if you are using a PC – to update this page.

12 issues for £12