Obama refuses to endorse Cameron’s deficit plan

US president emphasises the need for investment and says that “every country is different”.

The Tories were desperate for Barack Obama to endorse the coalition's deficit reduction plan, but at today's press conference he didn't even come close. In response to a question on the subject from ITV's Tom Bradby, the US president emphasised that "every country is different" and praised the way that "concerted action" by the UK and the US had "yanked the world economy out of recession" – an implicit endorsement of the last Labour government's fiscal stimulus.

Obama, who noted in his introductory remarks that the pair come from "different political traditions", went on to stress the need to sustain investment in "education, science, technology and infrastructure". For the US president, unlike the coalition, economic growth is a precondition of deficit reduction, not a hoped-for outcome.

It was only towards the end (Obama's answers were incredibly long-winded) that he made a token reference to the need for governments to "live within their means" before adding that the "sequencing and pace" of deficit reduction would be different in each country. It wasn't what Cameron and George Osborne wanted to hear.

The irony is that there are some significant similarities between Obama's deficit reduction plan and the coalition's. As I noted in a recent Data Hound column, under the US president's plan, public-sector borrowing will fall from 10.9 per cent of GDP this year to 3.3 per cent in 2016. The coalition aims to reduce borrowing from 9.9 per cent of GDP this year to 1.5 per cent in 2016.

Thus, although the total fiscal consolidation planned by Osborne remains the largest, the difference is not as great as some imply. In addition, Obama plans to achieve three-quarters of the US deficit reduction through spending cuts, including lower debt interest payments, and the rest through tax rises, in a ratio similar to the coalition's 73:27 split.

But the crucial difference is that while the US economy has grown by 1.2 per cent in the past six months, the UK economy has flatlined. The strength of the US recovery means that Obama can afford to reduce the deficit without fatally weakening growth. The same, alas, cannot be said of Osborne's Britain.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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As crime moves online, the police need the investment in technology to follow

Technology offers solutions, not just threats.

It’s perhaps inevitable that as the world becomes more digital, so does crime. This week Alison Saunders, director of public prosecutions, recognised that online crime is as serious as face-to-face crime. “Hate is hate,” Saunders wrote referring to internet abuse, and the police should protect people from it wherever they are. This will add demand to under-pressure police forces. And it is only the tip of the iceberg. 

Forty-seven per cent of crime involves an online element. Police recorded 30,000 instances of online stalking and harassment last year. People are 20 times more likely to be a victim of fraud than robbery, costing businesses an estimated £144bn a year. On a conservative estimate, 2,500 UK citizens use the anonymous dark web browser, Tor, for illegal purposes such as drug dealing, revenge porn and child sexual exploitation.

The police need new technology to meet demand, a Reform report published today finds. Some progress has been made in recent years. West Midlands Police uses an online portal for people to report incidents. Durham uses evidence-gathering software to collect social media information on suspects, and then instantly compile a report that can be shared with courts. Police have benefited from smartphones to share information, and body-worn cameras, which have reduced complaints against police by 93 per cent.

Yet, Theresa May’s 2016 remarks that police use “technology that lags woefully behind what they use as consumers” still stand. Officers interviewed for Reform’s research implored: “Give us the tools to do our job”.

Online evidence portals should be upgraded to accept CCTV footage. Apps should be developed to allow officers to learn about new digital threats, following the US army’s library of knowledge-sharing apps. Augmented-reality glasses are being used in the Netherlands to help officers identify evidence at digital crime scenes. Officers would save a trip back to the station if they could collect fingerprints on smartphones and statements on body-worn cameras.

New technology requires investment, but forces are reducing the resources put into IT as reserves have dried up. Durham plans to cut spend by 60 per cent between 2015-16 and 2019-20. The government should help fund equipment which can meet demand and return future productivity savings. If the Home Office invested the same as the Department of Health, another department pushing “transformative” technology, it would invest an extra £450m a year. This funding should come from administrative savings delivered through accelerating the Government’s automation agenda, which the think tank Reform has previously calculated would save Whitehall £2.6bn a year.

As crime moves online, police must follow. Saunders is right to point to the importance of meeting it. But technology offers solutions, not just threats. Installing the next generation of equipment will give police the tools to do their jobs, addressing online hate and more. 

Alexander Hitchcock is a senior researcher at reform