Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning’s papers.

1. If Scotland does secede, I won't be alone in mourning my country (Observer)

Those of us who count ourselves as British fear that Scottish independence would tear the nation apart, writes David Mitchell.

2. Bahrain is trying to drown the protests in Shia blood (Independent on Sunday)

Claiming that the opposition is being orchestrated by Iran, the al-Khalifa regime has unleashed a vicious sectarian clampdown, writes Patrick Cockburn.

3. To have a hope of power, Labour must turn from dull into dynamic (Observer)

Ed Miliband's party needs to forget complacent assumptions and remember that the task is both big and urgent, says Andrew Rawnsley.

4. Europe and immigration are vital issues, so let's discuss them (Sunday Telegraph)

The voters want a debate on Europe's influence, says this leading article, and the government should let them have it.

5. Live up to your own slogan, Dave (Independent on Sunday)

"All in this together" must count as one of the worst slogans dreamt up by supposedly intelligent people, says a leading article. More effectively than any lines devised by the Labour Party, it invites cynicism – so David Cameron must address social inequality if he has any chance of making it believable.

6. Cameron has the makings of a truly great prime minister (Sunday Telegraph)

Many of those in No 10 end up as essentially irrelevant figures, but a small few attain truly heroic status, says Peter Oborne.

7. Twitter is home to the dull and dysfunctional – I'll never join (Independent on Sunday)

This is the age of the ego, says Janet Street-Porter authoritatively. If celebrities want privacy, they must give up sending press releases and posing for Hello!.

8. Stop punishing the McCanns (Sunday Times) (£)

As I sat welling up in my kitchen listening to Kate McCann tell her distressing story, hundreds of people logged on to Twitter to type out poison about her in real time, says India Knight.

9. So their dossier was sexed up. No wonder the cabal want "closure" (Mail on Sunday)

Major General Michael Laurie has now admitted to the Chilcot inquiry that he was pressured to make the case for war in Iraq, writes Suzanne Moore. Eight years on, it still matters – because our lack of clarity about Libya stems from our embarrassment about Iraq.

10. The press must put its house in order (Observer)

Lies, bullying and kiss-and-tell profiteering do, sadly, go unpunished too often in newsrooms, says a leading article. But much investigative energy is spent unearthing grave abuses of power – so self-regulation is better than legislation.

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Calm down, everyone – of course Nigel Farage is in the running for TIME Person of the Year

The former Ukip leader has been shortlisted for the iconic magazine list.

While your mole is no fan of former Ukip leader and triumphalist frog Nigel Farage, it has to scurry to his defence in this instance. There's been a big brouhaha (ie. some people on Twitter have posted a few half-hearted opinions and crap jokes) about the bonvivant Brexiteer being shortlisted for TIME's iconic Person of the Year.

He is one of 11 contenders for the position listed by the magazine, alongside the likes of Donald Trump, Mark Zuckerberg and Beyoncé. (What a dinner party that would be. We hope Zuck puts the photos up on Facebook.)

Why are people surprised by this? Farage is the reason the UK is leaving the European Union, and by doing so has made a big impact on national and global politics. Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin famously won the award, so we know it's not an endorsement, simply a measure of impact. And others on this year's list suggest this too: Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, Narendra Modi, Vladimir Putin, Donald Trump – all dubious political figures who have caused controversy.

So why the big deal about Farage?

Read more about TIME's shortlist here. The winner is announced tomorrow.

I'm a mole, innit.