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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning’s papers.

1. Osama Bin Laden's death: the US patriot reflex (Guardian)

Given 9/11, a desire for vengeance is a legitimate emotional response, says Gary Younge. But it is not a foreign policy.

2. Bin Laden is more dangerous dead than alive (Times) (£)

Ed Husain says that it was right to remove this enemy. But it would be wrong to think that his demise has weakened the jihadists.

3. Security chiefs must end Pakistan's duplicity (Financial Times)

Osama Bin Laden's death gives Islamabad an opportunity to fix much that is wrong, writes Mansoor Ijaz.

4. Pakistan and Osama Bin Laden: how the west was conned (Daily Telegraph)

The ISI and its covert support for Islamist terrorism must be confronted, argues Praveen Swami.

5. For ten years Osama Bin Laden filled a gap left by the Soviet Union. Who will be the baddie now? (Guardian)

Adam Curtis says that neoconservatives, "terror journalists" and Osama Bin Laden himself all had their own reasons to create a simple story of looming apocalypse.

6. There has been pain but we were right to fight (Times) (£)

What is happening across the Arab world shows that al-Qaeda has failed spectacularly, says Jack Straw.

7. Just say Yes to voting reform (Independent)

As the polls point to a substantial lead for the No campaign, says this editorial, there are still 24 hours left to change the system.

8. Nick Clegg is out of his depth – and David Cameron should let him sink (Daily Telegraph)

The Tories' bargaining power in the coalition will increase after tomorrow's elections, Simon Heffer predicts.

9. Ian Tomlinson verdict: the people defer no more (Guardian)

The Tomlinson jury showed how completely public views of the police have changed, says Duncan Campbell.

10. Chances are better now of the US fixing its deficit (Independent)

There is, after any memorable event, an immediate instinct to look for economic and financial consequences, says Hamish McRae.