The coalition’s NHS headache gets bigger

Waiting times reach a three-year high following the decision to relax targets.

Iain Duncan Smith recently caused the government much embarrassment when he admitted that waiting times at his local hospital had increased since last year. Now, a new report by the King's Fund shows that the picture isn't much better elsewhere.

Hospital waiting times are now at their highest since April 2008, with 15 per cent of patients waiting over 18 weeks for treatment. Given the financial pressures on the National Health Service, these figures are hardly disastrous. But the numbers are moving in the wrong direction and cannot be simply explained by seasonal fluctuations.

The news will call into question Andrew Lansley's decision to relax Labour's waiting-time targets last June. As the King's Fund chief economist, Professor John Appleby, a co-author of the report, pointed out: "In the past the two things that kept waiting down were targets and extra money. Managers got sacked for not meeting targets. And of course in the future there won't be the same amount of extra money."

They may not have been fashionable, but Labour's much-derided targets and patient guarantees produced results. Lansley's decision to "relax" targets has had the reverse effect.

One of his first acts as Health Secretary was to pull back on the four-hour Accident and Emergency target, which has since been scrapped entirely. The result is that the number of patients waiting more than four hours has risen from 176,522 to 292,052, a 65 per cent increase and the highest level in five years.

At a time when the coalition is struggling to convince the public that the health service is "safe in its hands", a rise in waiting times is politically toxic. History teaches us that once governments lose trust on the NHS, they rarely win it back.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Will Jeremy Corbyn stand down if Labour loses the general election?

Defeat at the polls might not be the end of Corbyn’s leadership.

The latest polls suggest that Labour is headed for heavy defeat in the June general election. Usually a general election loss would be the trigger for a leader to quit: Michael Foot, Gordon Brown and Ed Miliband all stood down after their first defeat, although Neil Kinnock saw out two losses before resigning in 1992.

It’s possible, if unlikely, that Corbyn could become prime minister. If that prospect doesn’t materialise, however, the question is: will Corbyn follow the majority of his predecessors and resign, or will he hang on in office?

Will Corbyn stand down? The rules

There is no formal process for the parliamentary Labour party to oust its leader, as it discovered in the 2016 leadership challenge. Even after a majority of his MPs had voted no confidence in him, Corbyn stayed on, ultimately winning his second leadership contest after it was decided that the current leader should be automatically included on the ballot.

This year’s conference will vote on to reform the leadership selection process that would make it easier for a left-wing candidate to get on the ballot (nicknamed the “McDonnell amendment” by centrists): Corbyn could be waiting for this motion to pass before he resigns.

Will Corbyn stand down? The membership

Corbyn’s support in the membership is still strong. Without an equally compelling candidate to put before the party, Corbyn’s opponents in the PLP are unlikely to initiate another leadership battle they’re likely to lose.

That said, a general election loss could change that. Polling from March suggests that half of Labour members wanted Corbyn to stand down either immediately or before the general election.

Will Corbyn stand down? The rumours

Sources close to Corbyn have said that he might not stand down, even if he leads Labour to a crushing defeat this June. They mention Kinnock’s survival after the 1987 general election as a precedent (although at the 1987 election, Labour did gain seats).

Will Corbyn stand down? The verdict

Given his struggles to manage his own MPs and the example of other leaders, it would be remarkable if Corbyn did not stand down should Labour lose the general election. However, staying on after a vote of no-confidence in 2016 was also remarkable, and the mooted changes to the leadership election process give him a reason to hold on until September in order to secure a left-wing succession.

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