Can Ed Miliband reform the NHS, and not just save it?

Labour’s health policy should focus on patient empowerment and obtaining the best value for money fo

Ed Miliband's primary task today was to turn the screw on Andrew Lansley. In this, he has been largely successful, but his speech was also revealing for what it says about his future approach to public-service reform.

During the Labour leadership campaign, none of the candidates had an incentive to raise difficult reform arguments, for fear of alienating union and grass-roots votes. This might have been tolerable if Labour had renewed its pitch on public services in its last years in office. But despite repeated attempts, it only came close to a new, post-Blairite paradigm with its manifesto pledges on citizen guarantees or entitlements and public-sector takeovers of weak providers by strong ones. It is fair to say that Labour thinking on public services has not advanced much since about 2004.

The coalition government has made much running dismantling the worst elements of New Labour's statecraft: its indicators and targets, anaemic localism and a latter-day preference for stakeholder management over bold reform. But it has said very little about the big strategic choices. There is no sense in the coalition's programme of which public services best support full employment and an affordable welfare state; of the challenges that an ageing society poses for reform of the NHS and social care; or how real innovation and productivity can be secured in universal services that face enormous cost pressures.

Miliband devoted a substantial section of today's speech to outlining the main long-term challenges facing the NHS, including far higher levels of chronic disease, growing levels of mental illness and the rising social care needs of the elderly. Each of these challenges requires services that are more joined up (integrating NHS care with social care provision, for example) and at the same time more preventative, to take pressure off the acute services.

But they will also entail rising costs. This is why making public services more productive and efficient needs to be a key task for the centre left and why Miliband is right to say that he will be "a reformer of the state as well as the market". If we are to defend high-quality universal public services, at a time when voices on the right are calling for services to be cut back and targeted just at the most disadvantaged, then we need to set out how these can be afforded, given rising cost pressures and the public's reluctance to pay higher levels of tax.

Miliband emphasised that to make services responsive to their users requires strong forms of accountability. Here he needs to learn the lessons of the last Labour government, which generally favoured the use of central targets in order to hold professionals to account. These targets did lead to significant improvements – waiting times fell and the number of failing schools was radically reduced. Nevertheless, there were too many targets that made doctors and teachers the slaves of a tick-box culture. Professionals on the front line need the flexibility to do what is right for individual patients and children, rather than simply follow Whitehall guidelines.

A chance to pull ahead

But if Miliband wants to reduce central targets, how does he ensure accountability to patients and parents? In the health service, the proposed health and well-being boards need to be strengthened by giving them the power to sign off the strategic plans of GP consortiums.

In education, it is crazy for the secretary of state to be directly funding an ever-growing number of free schools and academies from Whitehall. Instead, we should look at the idea of our big cities having an appointed schools commissioner, whose role would be to raise educational standards in their area, allocate funding to each school and provide shared support services to local schools. Having a single individual to perform this role would provide for greater focus and accountability to parents.

In policing, Labour should accept the government's plans for elected police and crime commissioners, but in the long term look at shifting responsibilities for policing in the large cities to elected mayors.

Miliband is absolutely right to point to the lack of patient empowerment in the coalition's NHS reforms: the agenda is all about bureaucratic change or market disciplines. Very little is said about passing power to patients. This is a golden opportunity for Labour to get ahead of the debate, by advocating the devolution of funding to "personal budgets" for those with chronic long-term conditions.

But Miliband is relatively silent on the role of competition in public services. Oppositions always default to woolly talk of "collaboration" and partnership. But competition has its place. In the NHS Blair's 2006 reforms – which gave patients the right to choose from a list of five hospitals and which led to competition for patients between NHS trusts – successfully improved outcomes (PDF) measured by length of hospital stay and deaths from heart attacks.

Labour should oppose the government's proposal to make the promotion of competition the overriding objective of the health regulator Monitor. This is putting the cart before the horse. Instead, its objective should be ensuring the best value for money for the taxpayer: competition may or may not be the best means of achieving that.

Ed Miliband criticised the Health Bill on the grounds that it would undermine the sense of "national mission" underpinning the NHS. He should be careful that talk of the public-service ethos is not used simply to defend vested interests. But his defence of the NHS as a national institution resonates with the "Blue Labour" approach.

The NHS is a popular public institution, which embodies values of solidarity, public interestedness and fairness. It is a British tradition. Any decent society should defend institutions that are run by and large in the public interest and not simply for profit. There is a very real danger that these institutions could be lost in the government's rush to expose every public service to market competition.

Miliband may save the NHS, but can he reform it?

Nick Pearce is director of the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR).

Nick Pearce is Professor of Public Policy & Director of the Institute for Policy Research, University of Bath.

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Air pollution: 5 steps to vanquishing an invisible killer

A new report looks at the economics of air pollution. 

110, 150, 520... These chilling statistics are the number of deaths attributable to particulate air pollution for the cities of Southampton, Nottingham and Birmingham in 2010 respectively. Or how about 40,000 - that is the total number of UK deaths per year that are attributable the combined effects of particulate matter (PM2.5) and Nitrogen Oxides (NOx).

This situation sucks, to say the very least. But while there are no dramatic images to stir up action, these deaths are preventable and we know their cause. Road traffic is the worst culprit. Traffic is responsible for 80 per cent of NOx on high pollution roads, with diesel engines contributing the bulk of the problem.

Now a new report by ResPublica has compiled a list of ways that city councils around the UK can help. The report argues that: “The onus is on cities to create plans that can meet the health and economic challenge within a short time-frame, and identify what they need from national government to do so.”

This is a diplomatic way of saying that current government action on the subject does not go far enough – and that cities must help prod them into gear. That includes poking holes in the government’s proposed plans for new “Clean Air Zones”.

Here are just five of the ways the report suggests letting the light in and the pollution out:

1. Clean up the draft Clean Air Zones framework

Last October, the government set out its draft plans for new Clean Air Zones in the UK’s five most polluted cities, Birmingham, Derby, Leeds, Nottingham and Southampton (excluding London - where other plans are afoot). These zones will charge “polluting” vehicles to enter and can be implemented with varying levels of intensity, with three options that include cars and one that does not.

But the report argues that there is still too much potential for polluters to play dirty with the rules. Car-charging zones must be mandatory for all cities that breach the current EU standards, the report argues (not just the suggested five). Otherwise national operators who own fleets of vehicles could simply relocate outdated buses or taxis to places where they don’t have to pay.  

Different vehicles should fall under the same rules, the report added. Otherwise, taking your car rather than the bus could suddenly seem like the cost-saving option.

2. Vouchers to vouch-safe the project’s success

The government is exploring a scrappage scheme for diesel cars, to help get the worst and oldest polluting vehicles off the road. But as the report points out, blanket scrappage could simply put a whole load of new fossil-fuel cars on the road.

Instead, ResPublica suggests using the revenue from the Clean Air Zone charges, plus hiked vehicle registration fees, to create “Pollution Reduction Vouchers”.

Low-income households with older cars, that would be liable to charging, could then use the vouchers to help secure alternative transport, buy a new and compliant car, or retrofit their existing vehicle with new technology.

3. Extend Vehicle Excise Duty

Vehicle Excise Duty is currently only tiered by how much CO2 pollution a car creates for the first year. After that it becomes a flat rate for all cars under £40,000. The report suggests changing this so that the most polluting vehicles for CO2, NOx and PM2.5 continue to pay higher rates throughout their life span.

For ClientEarth CEO James Thornton, changes to vehicle excise duty are key to moving people onto cleaner modes of transport: “We need a network of clean air zones to keep the most polluting diesel vehicles from the most polluted parts of our towns and cities and incentives such as a targeted scrappage scheme and changes to vehicle excise duty to move people onto cleaner modes of transport.”

4. Repurposed car parks

You would think city bosses would want less cars in the centre of town. But while less cars is good news for oxygen-breathers, it is bad news for city budgets reliant on parking charges. But using car parks to tap into new revenue from property development and joint ventures could help cities reverse this thinking.

5. Prioritise public awareness

Charge zones can be understandably unpopular. In 2008, a referendum in Manchester defeated the idea of congestion charging. So a big effort is needed to raise public awareness of the health crisis our roads have caused. Metro mayors should outline pollution plans in their manifestos, the report suggests. And cities can take advantage of their existing assets. For example in London there are plans to use electronics in the Underground to update travellers on the air pollution levels.

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Change is already in the air. Southampton has used money from the Local Sustainable Travel Fund to run a successful messaging campaign. And in 2011 Nottingham City Council became the first city to implement a Workplace Parking levy – a scheme which has raised £35.3m to help extend its tram system, upgrade the station and purchase electric buses.

But many more “air necessities” are needed before we can forget about pollution’s worry and its strife.  

 

India Bourke is an environment writer and editorial assistant at the New Statesman.