Morning call: the pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning’s papers.

1. David Cameron's well-oiled winning machine is now a car crash (Guardian)

From the NHS to schools, a catalogue of errors and incompetence is undermining confidence in a once-pitch-perfect Tory party, says Polly Toynbee.

2. Mea culpa that reaches right to the very top (Independent)

News International's admission that it was responsible for the hacking of the phones of public figures ranging from a former member of the cabinet to a Hollywood actress represents a seismic moment for the management of Britain's biggest newspaper publisher, says Ian Burrell.

3. What Hugh Grant revealed about the paparazzi and power (Independent)

You wouldn't necessarily expect the most interesting journalism of the week to come from a film star and his ex-girlfriend, writes Christina Patterson – referring to this New Statesman piece.

4. A misbegotten idea that will prolong the reign of the old boys and elites (Independent)

Nick Clegg sometimes just listens to music and cries, he told Jemima Khan in an NS interview this week. We all know the feeling when we hear about his throughts on social mobility, says Michael Bywater.

5. Ditch the spin-cation. We like flash hols too (Times) (£)

Cameron shouldn't feel obliged to fly Ryanair and stay in cheap hotels, says Janice Turner.

6. I just can't see Berlusconi flying Ryanair (Telegraph)

Compared with the comic turns in other countries, our leaders seem such a dull lot, says Matthew Norman.

7. It's not our job to save the euro (Telegraph)

The failure of the euro will signify the ultimate failure of the European ideal, says Simon Heffer.

8. Our revolution's doing what Saleh can't – uniting Yemen (Guardian)

Yemen's struggle to overthrow the president has brought stability and peace to a country riven by conflict, says Tawakkol Karman. This is truly historic.

9. Can we really judge the past by the present? (Times) (£)

Matthew Parris on the brutality of empire – and the cover-ups which show that colonial officials knew their actions were wrong.

10. One year on: the sun is shining, my life is starting again (Times) (£)

The Times columnist Melanie Reid broke her neck 12 months ago. Now she's back home.

Oli Scarff/ Getty
Show Hide image

Andy Burnham's full speech on attack: "Manchester is waking up to the most difficult of dawns"

"We are grieving today, but we are strong."

Following Monday night's terror attack on an Ariana Grande concert at the Manchester Arena, newly elected mayor of the city Andy Burnham, gave a speech outside Manchester Town Hall on Tuesday morning, the full text of which is below: 

After our darkest of nights, Manchester is today waking up to the most difficult of dawns. 

It’s hard to believe what has happened here in the last few hours and to put into words the shock, anger and hurt that we feel today.

These were children, young people and their families that those responsible chose to terrorise and kill.

This was an evil act. Our first thoughts are with the families of those killed and injured. And we will do whatever we can to support them.

We are grieving today, but we are strong. Today it will be business as usual as far as possible in our great city.

I want to thank the hundreds of police, fire and ambulance staff who worked throughout the night in the most difficult circumstances imaginable.

We have had messages of support from cities around the country and across the world, and we want to thank them for that.

But lastly I wanted to thank the people of Manchester. Even in the minute after the attack, they opened their doors to strangers and drove them away from danger.

They gave the best possible immediate response to those who seek to divide us and it will be that spirit of Manchester that will prevail and hold us together.

0800 7318496