Morning call: the pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning’s papers.

1. David Cameron's well-oiled winning machine is now a car crash (Guardian)

From the NHS to schools, a catalogue of errors and incompetence is undermining confidence in a once-pitch-perfect Tory party, says Polly Toynbee.

2. Mea culpa that reaches right to the very top (Independent)

News International's admission that it was responsible for the hacking of the phones of public figures ranging from a former member of the cabinet to a Hollywood actress represents a seismic moment for the management of Britain's biggest newspaper publisher, says Ian Burrell.

3. What Hugh Grant revealed about the paparazzi and power (Independent)

You wouldn't necessarily expect the most interesting journalism of the week to come from a film star and his ex-girlfriend, writes Christina Patterson – referring to this New Statesman piece.

4. A misbegotten idea that will prolong the reign of the old boys and elites (Independent)

Nick Clegg sometimes just listens to music and cries, he told Jemima Khan in an NS interview this week. We all know the feeling when we hear about his throughts on social mobility, says Michael Bywater.

5. Ditch the spin-cation. We like flash hols too (Times) (£)

Cameron shouldn't feel obliged to fly Ryanair and stay in cheap hotels, says Janice Turner.

6. I just can't see Berlusconi flying Ryanair (Telegraph)

Compared with the comic turns in other countries, our leaders seem such a dull lot, says Matthew Norman.

7. It's not our job to save the euro (Telegraph)

The failure of the euro will signify the ultimate failure of the European ideal, says Simon Heffer.

8. Our revolution's doing what Saleh can't – uniting Yemen (Guardian)

Yemen's struggle to overthrow the president has brought stability and peace to a country riven by conflict, says Tawakkol Karman. This is truly historic.

9. Can we really judge the past by the present? (Times) (£)

Matthew Parris on the brutality of empire – and the cover-ups which show that colonial officials knew their actions were wrong.

10. One year on: the sun is shining, my life is starting again (Times) (£)

The Times columnist Melanie Reid broke her neck 12 months ago. Now she's back home.

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PMQs review: Jeremy Corbyn turns "the nasty party" back on Theresa May

The Labour leader exploited Conservative splits over disability benefits.

It didn't take long for Theresa May to herald the Conservatives' Copeland by-election victory at PMQs (and one couldn't blame her). But Jeremy Corbyn swiftly brought her down to earth. The Labour leader denounced the government for "sneaking out" its decision to overrule a court judgement calling for Personal Independence Payments (PIPs) to be extended to those with severe mental health problems.

Rather than merely expressing his own outrage, Corbyn drew on that of others. He smartly quoted Tory backbencher Heidi Allen, one of the tax credit rebels, who has called on May to "think agan" and "honour" the court's rulings. The Prime Minister protested that the government was merely returning PIPs to their "original intention" and was already spending more than ever on those with mental health conditions. But Corbyn had more ammunition, denouncing Conservative policy chair George Freeman for his suggestion that those "taking pills" for anxiety aren't "really disabled". After May branded Labour "the nasty party" in her conference speech, Corbyn suggested that the Tories were once again worthy of her epithet.

May emphasised that Freeman had apologised and, as so often, warned that the "extra support" promised by Labour would be impossible without the "strong economy" guaranteed by the Conservatives. "The one thing we know about Labour is that they would bankrupt Britain," she declared. Unlike on previous occasions, Corbyn had a ready riposte, reminding the Tories that they had increased the national debt by more than every previous Labour government.

But May saved her jibe of choice for the end, recalling shadow cabinet minister Cat Smith's assertion that the Copeland result was an "incredible achivement" for her party. "I think that word actually sums up the Right Honourable Gentleman's leadership. In-cred-ible," May concluded, with a rather surreal Thatcher-esque flourish.

Yet many economists and EU experts say the same of her Brexit plan. Having repeatedly hailed the UK's "strong economy" (which has so far proved resilient), May had better hope that single market withdrawal does not wreck it. But on Brexit, as on disability benefits, it is Conservative rebels, not Corbyn, who will determine her fate.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.