Morning call: the pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning’s papers.

1. David Cameron's well-oiled winning machine is now a car crash (Guardian)

From the NHS to schools, a catalogue of errors and incompetence is undermining confidence in a once-pitch-perfect Tory party, says Polly Toynbee.

2. Mea culpa that reaches right to the very top (Independent)

News International's admission that it was responsible for the hacking of the phones of public figures ranging from a former member of the cabinet to a Hollywood actress represents a seismic moment for the management of Britain's biggest newspaper publisher, says Ian Burrell.

3. What Hugh Grant revealed about the paparazzi and power (Independent)

You wouldn't necessarily expect the most interesting journalism of the week to come from a film star and his ex-girlfriend, writes Christina Patterson – referring to this New Statesman piece.

4. A misbegotten idea that will prolong the reign of the old boys and elites (Independent)

Nick Clegg sometimes just listens to music and cries, he told Jemima Khan in an NS interview this week. We all know the feeling when we hear about his throughts on social mobility, says Michael Bywater.

5. Ditch the spin-cation. We like flash hols too (Times) (£)

Cameron shouldn't feel obliged to fly Ryanair and stay in cheap hotels, says Janice Turner.

6. I just can't see Berlusconi flying Ryanair (Telegraph)

Compared with the comic turns in other countries, our leaders seem such a dull lot, says Matthew Norman.

7. It's not our job to save the euro (Telegraph)

The failure of the euro will signify the ultimate failure of the European ideal, says Simon Heffer.

8. Our revolution's doing what Saleh can't – uniting Yemen (Guardian)

Yemen's struggle to overthrow the president has brought stability and peace to a country riven by conflict, says Tawakkol Karman. This is truly historic.

9. Can we really judge the past by the present? (Times) (£)

Matthew Parris on the brutality of empire – and the cover-ups which show that colonial officials knew their actions were wrong.

10. One year on: the sun is shining, my life is starting again (Times) (£)

The Times columnist Melanie Reid broke her neck 12 months ago. Now she's back home.

Grant Shapps on the campaign trail. Photo: Getty
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Grant Shapps resigns over Tory youth wing bullying scandal

The minister, formerly party chairman, has resigned over allegations of bullying and blackmail made against a Tory activist. 

Grant Shapps, who was a key figure in the Tory general election campaign, has resigned following allegations about a bullying scandal among Conservative activists.

Shapps was formerly party chairman, but was demoted to international development minister after May. His formal statement is expected shortly.

The resignation follows lurid claims about bullying and blackmail among Tory activists. One, Mark Clarke, has been accused of putting pressure on a fellow activist who complained about his behaviour to withdraw the allegation. The complainant, Elliot Johnson, later killed himself.

The junior Treasury minister Robert Halfon also revealed that he had an affair with a young activist after being warned that Clarke planned to blackmail him over the relationship. Former Tory chair Sayeedi Warsi says that she was targeted by Clarke on Twitter, where he tried to portray her as an anti-semite. 

Shapps appointed Mark Clarke to run RoadTrip 2015, where young Tory activists toured key marginals on a bus before the general election. 

Today, the Guardian published an emotional interview with the parents of 21-year-old Elliot Johnson, the activist who killed himself, in which they called for Shapps to consider his position. Ray Johnson also spoke to BBC's Newsnight:


The Johnson family claimed that Shapps and co-chair Andrew Feldman had failed to act on complaints made against Clarke. Feldman says he did not hear of the bullying claims until August. 

Asked about the case at a conference in Malta, David Cameron pointedly refused to offer Shapps his full backing, saying a statement would be released. “I think it is important that on the tragic case that took place that the coroner’s inquiry is allowed to proceed properly," he added. “I feel deeply for his parents, It is an appalling loss to suffer and that is why it is so important there is a proper coroner’s inquiry. In terms of what the Conservative party should do, there should be and there is a proper inquiry that asks all the questions as people come forward. That will take place. It is a tragic loss of a talented young life and it is not something any parent should go through and I feel for them deeply.” 

Mark Clarke denies any wrongdoing.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.