Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning’s papers.

1. The bombing continues until Gaddafi goes (Times) (£)

David Cameron, Barack Obama and Nicolas Sarkozy write that the Libyan leader will make his country a pariah state. To leave him in power would be an unconscionable betrayal.

2. Forty nations made a pact on Libya – now they have to act on it (Daily Telegraph)

The main burden of the military effort in Libya is falling on just two of the 40 or so countries involved in the Nato mission, writes Con Coughlin.

3. Obama's fightback has begun (Financial Times)

The Republicans can scarcely contain their glee that the president has entered the 2012 election campaign championing tax hikes, writes Simon Schama.

4. This royal frenzy should embarrass us all (Independent)

Johann Hari maintains that republicans are not the Grinch, trying to ruin the "big day" for William and Kate: they are proposing a positive vision.

5. Labour must change its tune to the new blues (Times) (£)

An embryonic alliance between the party's co-operative roots and its Blairite rump could be its way back to power, says Philip Collins.

6. Policing demonstrations: grounds for protest (Guardian)

It is increasingly clear that something had gone badly awry with the Met's handling of protests in 2009, says an editorial.

7. Cameron's cynical and disappointing approach to immigration (Independent)

A leading article argues that the true objective of the speech was to shore up Tory support ahead of next month's local elections.

8. Talking tough (Times) (£)

The apparent schism in the coalition over immigration is more tactical than real, says this leading article.

9. The IMF needs to find its voice again (Financial Times)

The old consensus against capital controls was not mere dogma. Most of the time they don't work, argues Sebastian Mallaby.

10. The banks needed Scarman's cold eye, but Vickers blinked (Guardian)

The report on Britain's inner-city riots 30 years ago changed police behaviour, says Martin Kettle. Today's Vickers commission on banking makes proposals to fit our timorous times.

Getty
Show Hide image

Jeremy Corbyn will stay on the Labour leadership ballot paper, judge rules

Labour donor Michael Foster had challenged the decision at the High Court.

The High Court has ruled that Jeremy Corbyn should be allowed to automatically run again for Labour leader after the decision of the party's National Executive Committee was challenged. 

Corbyn declared it a "waste of time" and an attempt to overturn the right of Labour members to choose their leader.

The decision ends the hope of some anti-Corbyn Labour members that he could be excluded from the contest altogether.

The legal challenge had been brought by Michael Foster, a Labour donor and former parliamentary candidate, who maintained he was simply seeking the views of experts.

But when the experts spoke, it was in Corbyn's favour. 

The ruling said: "Accordingly, the Judge accepted that the decision of the NEC was correct and that Mr Corbyn was entitled to be a candidate in the forthcoming election without the need for nominations."

This judgement was "wholly unaffected by political considerations", it added. 

Corbyn said: "I welcome the decision by the High Court to respect the democracy of the Labour Party.

"This has been a waste of time and resources when our party should be focused on holding the government to account.

"There should have been no question of the right of half a million Labour party members to choose their own leader being overturned. If anything, the aim should be to expand the number of voters in this election. I hope all candidates and supporters will reject any attempt to prolong this process, and that we can now proceed with the election in a comradely and respectful manner."

Iain McNicol, general secretary of the Labour Party, said: “We are delighted that the Court has upheld the authority and decision of the National Executive Committee of the Labour Party. 

“We will continue with the leadership election as agreed by the NEC."

If Corbyn had been excluded, he would have had to seek the nomination of 51 MPs, which would have been difficult since just 40 voted against the no confidence motion in him. He would therefore have been effectively excluded from running. 

Owen Smith, the candidate backed by rebel MPs, told the BBC earlier he believed Corbyn should stay on the ballot paper. 

He said after the judgement: “I’m pleased the court has done the right thing and ruled that Jeremy should be on the ballot. This now puts to bed any questions about the process, so we can get on with discussing the issues that really matter."

The news was greeted with celebration by Corbyn supporters.