The Lib Dem retreat

The party will fight fewer seats on 5 May than in 2007 after struggling to find candidates.

Nick Clegg (who was interviewed by Jemima Khan for this week's issue) might be able to shrug off his party's terrible poll ratings (10 per cent in the latest YouGov poll) and insist that "there's only one poll that counts and that's the election". But he'll have more trouble explaining away the news that the Lib Dems will be fighting fewer seats in next month's local elections than they did in the 2007.

Today's Financial Times reports that the party is expected to field candidates in about 58-60 per cent of seats, against 64 per cent four years ago. The party's chief executive, Chris Fox, insists that the Lib Dems are simply concentrating resources on those seats where they are well placed to win.

He says: "This shows no trend whatsoever. We are contesting as many of the seats that matter as we ever had. Whether there are as many paper candidates – or less likely to win candidates – I don't know."

But the ConservativeHome editor, Tim Montgomerie, reveals: "We have been hearing from Conservative councillors that the Liberal Democrats are finding it incredibly hard to find candidates." In Warrington, for instance, where the party has been part of the coalition running the council for the past five years, the Lib Dems are not fielding any candidates in two wards.

The party also plans to leave uncontested wards in East Dorset, East Devon, Hambleton and Waverley. It might be time to recycle some of those "winning here" posters.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Appreciate the full horror of Nigel Farage's pro-Trump speech

The former Ukip leader has appeared at a Donald Trump rally. It went exactly as you would expect.

It is with a heavy heart that I must announce Nigel Farage is at it again.

The on-again, off-again Ukip leader and current Member of the European Parliament has appeared at a Donald Trump rally to lend his support to the presidential candidate.

It was, predictably, distressing.

Farage started by telling his American audience why they, like he, should be positive.

"I come to you from the United Kingdom"

Okay, good start. Undeniably true.

"– with a message of hope –

Again, probably quite true.

Image: Clearly hopeful (Wikipedia Screenshot)

– and optimism.”

Ah.

Image: Nigel Farage in front of a poster showing immigrants who are definitely not European (Getty)

He continues: “If the little people, if the real people–”

Wait, what?

Why is Trump nodding sagely at this?

The little people?

Image: It's a plane with the name Trump on it (Wikimedia Commons)

THE LITTLE PEOPLE?

Image: It's the word Trump on the side of a skyscraper I can't cope with this (Pixel)

THE ONLY LITTLE PERSON CLOSE TO TRUMP IS RIDING A MASSIVE STUFFED LION

Image: I don't even know what to tell you. It's Trump and his wife and a child riding a stuffed lion. 

IN A PENTHOUSE

A PENTHOUSE WHICH LOOKS LIKE LIBERACE WAS LET LOOSE WITH THE GILT ON DAY FIVE OF A PARTICULARLY BAD BENDER

Image: So much gold. Just gold, everywhere.

HIS WIFE HAS SO MANY BAGS SHE HAS TO EMPLOY A BAG MAN TO CARRY THEM

Image: I did not even know there were so many styles of Louis Vuitton, and my dentists has a lot of old copies of Vogue.

Anyway. Back to Farage, who is telling the little people that they can win "against the forces of global corporatism".

 

Image: Aaaaarggghhhh (Wikipedia Screenshot)

Ugh. Okay. What next? Oh god, he's telling them they can have a Brexit moment.

“... you can beat Washington...”

“... if enough decent people...”

“...are prepared to stand up against the establishment”

Image: A screenshot from Donald Trump's Wikipedia page.

I think I need a lie down.

Watch the full clip here:

Stephanie Boland is digital assistant at the New Statesman. She tweets at @stephanieboland