Wales votes in favour of greater law-making powers

Welsh Assembly will no longer need ratification from Westminster -- but what will this mean in pract

The Welsh Assembly will gain greater legislative control, after the country overwhelmingly voted "yes" in a referendum on direct law-making powers.

21 out of 22 Welsh counties voted in favour of the Assembly having power to pass laws without needing the green light from Westminster.
Welsh First Minister Carwyn Jones said that this would make the process more efficient and effective. He said:

To demand respect, you must first display self respect. Today we have done just that, and the rest of the world can now sit up and take notice of the fact that our small nation, here on the western edge of the continent of Europe, has demonstrated pride in who we are, and what we all stand for.

Some have raised concerns about the low turnout - just 35.4 per cent. However, 63.5 per cent of those votes were in favour, making this a more resounding victory than the 50.3 per cent on which the Assembly was established in 1997.

The "yes" result is being hailed as a positive across the board, with Labour MP Paul Murphy describing it as a "ringing endorsement of devolution". However, over at Left Foot Forward, Ed Jacobs flags up an ICM/BBC poll which showed that 48 per cent of voters in Wales felt they didn't have sufficient information to make a proper choice in the referendum. He warns:

Whilst the Assembly will now get the full law making powers enjoyed by Holyrood and Stormont, the low turnout and lack of understanding over the issue should spur those at Cardiff Bay to prove why it was worth giving them the powers to legislate without needing Westminster's permission.

Taking away the need for ratification from Westminster should streamline the system -- it currently costs in the region of £2m each year for laws to be okayed. As Jones said, it will also make it easier for politicians to speak in terms of what they will do, rather than what they will do once they have permission. What remains to be seen whether it is used to make a practical difference to the lives of Welsh citizens, or as Shadow Welsh Secretary Peter Hain suggested it might, to "stand up to the Tory-led Government in Westminster".

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

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Benn vs McDonnell: how Brexit has exposed the fight over Labour's party machine

In the wake of Brexit, should Labour MPs listen more closely to voters, or their own party members?

Two Labour MPs on primetime TV. Two prominent politicians ruling themselves out of a Labour leadership contest. But that was as far as the similarity went.

Hilary Benn was speaking hours after he resigned - or was sacked - from the Shadow Cabinet. He described Jeremy Corbyn as a "good and decent man" but not a leader.

Framing his overnight removal as a matter of conscience, Benn told the BBC's Andrew Marr: "I no longer have confidence in him [Corbyn] and I think the right thing to do would be for him to take that decision."

In Benn's view, diehard leftie pin ups do not go down well in the real world, or on the ballot papers of middle England. 

But while Benn may be drawing on a New Labour truism, this in turn rests on the assumption that voters matter more than the party members when it comes to winning elections.

That assumption was contested moments later by Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell.

Dismissive of the personal appeal of Shadow Cabinet ministers - "we can replace them" - McDonnell's message was that Labour under Corbyn had rejuvenated its electoral machine.

Pointing to success in by-elections and the London mayoral election, McDonnell warned would-be rebels: "Who is sovereign in our party? The people who are soverign are the party members. 

"I'm saying respect the party members. And in that way we can hold together and win the next election."

Indeed, nearly a year on from Corbyn's surprise election to the Labour leadership, it is worth remembering he captured nearly 60% of the 400,000 votes cast. Momentum, the grassroots organisation formed in the wake of his success, now has more than 50 branches around the country.

Come the next election, it will be these grassroots members who will knock on doors, hand out leaflets and perhaps even threaten to deselect MPs.

The question for wavering Labour MPs will be whether what they trust more - their own connection with voters, or this potentially unbiddable party machine.