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The five must-read posts from today, including Libya, the next Labour leader and the Ukip threat to

1. Why Libyan rebels' claims should not go unchallenged

Channel 4's Alex Thomson explains why reporters and the reported need to keep space between each other.

2. A Libyan no-fly zone is no different to invading Iraq

For the Telegraph, Con Coughlin argues that an effective no-fly zone is tantamount to a declaration of war.

3. Who will be the next Labour leader?

Over at Labour Uncut, Dan Hodges assesses Chuka Umunna's and Stella Creasy's chances of reaching the top job.

3. Yes, there's a growing Ukip threat to the Conservatives. But it's got less to do with the EU than you may think

ConservativeHome's Paul Goodman discusses the nature of the Ukip challenge to the Tories, and strategies for tackling it.

5. Clegg is asked to abolish himself in Commons written question

Political Scrapbook reports that the Deputy Prime Minister was asked whether he will axe his own post.

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RMT poised to rejoin the Labour Party

The transport union is set to vote on reaffiliation to the party, with RMT leaders backing the move.

Plans are being drawn up for the RMT (the National Union of Rail, Maritime and Transport Workers) to reaffiliate to the Labour Party in the wake of Jeremy Corbyn’s significant gains in the general election, the New Statesman has learnt.

The union, which represents tube drivers and other workers across the transport sector, was expelled from the Labour Party under Tony Blair after some Scottish branches voted to support the Scottish Socialist Party instead.

But the RMT endorsed both of Corbyn’s bids for the Labour leadership and its ruling national executive committee backed a Labour vote on 8 June.

Corbyn addressed the RMT’s annual general meeting in Exeter yesterday, where he was “given a hero’s welcome”, in the words of one delegate. Mick Cash, the RMT’s general secretary, praised Corbyn as the union’s “long-term friend and comrade”.

After the meeting, Steve Hedley, assistant general secretary at the RMT, posted a picture to Facebook with John McDonnell. The caption read: “With the shadow chancellor John McDonnell arguing that we should affiliate to the Labour Party after consulting fully and democratically with our members”.

The return of the RMT to Labour would be welcomed by the party leadership with open arms. And although its comparably small size would mean that the RMT would have little effect on the internal workings of Labour Party conference or its ruling NEC, its wide spread across the country could make the union a power player in the life of local Labour parties.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.

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