Public-sector pension reform is part of a wider agenda

Pension obligations are the biggest barrier to further privatisation.

The report on public-sector pensions from the former Labour minister John (now Lord) Hutton must be understood as part of a wider agenda.

First, after private-sector recklessness, greed and incompetence plunged us into financial crisis and recession, Tory politicians and right-wing newspapers aimed to deflect popular anger on to public-sector workers. They eagerly pointed out that, while stock-market falls and near-zero interest rates had slashed the value of most private-sector pensions, teachers, nurses, firefighters and local government bureaucrats continued to enjoy the prospect of a "gold-plated" retirement, on up to half their final salaries, with ample protection from inflation.

Government measures, notably changing the inflation index used in calculating payments, have already cut their value by around 25 per cent. But ministers reckon there is mileage in continuing the jihad.

Second, pension obligations are the biggest barrier to more privatising and outsourcing of public-sector services. Public services, we are repeatedly told, are run for the employees, not the public. They are being "reformed" so that they can be run for the benefit of capital.

This blog post is taken from Peter Wilby's First Thoughts column in this week's New Statesman, available now.

Peter Wilby was editor of the Independent on Sunday from 1995 to 1996 and of the New Statesman from 1998 to 2005. He writes the weekly First Thoughts column for the NS.

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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.