Dude, the president gave in to a girl!

Right-winger condemns Barack Obama for listening to the advice of women on Libya.

The decision to intervene in Libya was reportedly pushed by the "foreign policy Valkyries" of Obama's administration – Hillary Clinton, Samantha Power and Susan Rice. The Valkyries called on President Obama to ignore his doubts, and ignore the advice of the cautious Robert Gates. Careful readers may have noted something about this new breed of liberal hawk: none of them has a penis.

This has caused some consternation among commentators in the US. Writing in the National Review, an enjoyably right-wing magazine in the US, Mark Krikorian spelled out why the intervention had upset him.

Do you think Putin and A-jad and Chavez and the ChiComs are more afraid of Obama now? It was obvious to most of us that Hillary has more, uh, stones than Obama, but to have it confirmed so publicly for less attentive foreign goons means they're that much more likely to try to push us and see how The One responds.

Obama has no balls! But Clinton has. Perhaps that's why Bill played away from home! Hur, hur, hur. Krikorian then launches into the "I'm not sexist but . . ." part of his argument:

Before you send me any burning bras, the problem is not with women leaders – the enemies of the Virgin Queen and the Iron Lady can attest to that. The problem is not even with the president having strong female subordinates. Rather, Obama's pusillanimity has been hugely magnified by the contrast with the women directing his foreign policy and the fact that they nagged him to attack Libya until he gave in.

OK, so Krikorian is fine with women having positions of authority. The problem lies with Obama's spinelessness. Right? Wrong.

Maybe it's unfair and there shouldn't be any difference from having a male secretary of state do the same thing, but there is.

Essentially, his argument is: "Dude, the president gave in . . . to a girl."

According to Krikorian's logic, then, if Obama can be rolled over by a woman, he can be rolled over by anybody. At the next meeting of the G20, Putin will probably give the president a wedgie while Wen Jiabao runs away with his lunch money. So, remember: women, know your limits.

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How the Lib Dems learned to love all-women shortlists

Yes, the sitting Lib Dem MPs are mostly white, middle-aged middle class men. But the party's not taking any chances. 

I can’t tell you who’ll be the Lib Dem candidate in Southport on 8 June, but I do know one thing about them. As they’re replacing a sitting Lib Dem (John Pugh is retiring) - they’ll be female.

The same is true in many of our top 20 target seats, including places like Lewes (Kelly-Marie Blundell), Yeovil (Daisy Benson), Thornbury and Yate (Clare Young), and Sutton and Cheam (Amna Ahmad). There was air punching in Lib Dem offices all over the country on Tuesday when it was announced Jo Swinson was standing again in East Dunbartonshire.

And while every current Lib Dem constituency MP will get showered with love and attention in the campaign, one will get rather more attention than most - it’s no coincidence that Tim Farron’s first stop of the campaign was in Richmond Park, standing side by side with Sarah Olney.

How so?

Because the party membership took a long look at itself after the 2015 election - and a rather longer look at the eight white, middle-aged middle class men (sorry chaps) who now formed the Parliamentary party and said - "we’ve really got to sort this out".

And so after decades of prevarication, we put a policy in place to deliberately increase the diversity of candidates.

Quietly, over the last two years, the Liberal Democrats have been putting candidates into place in key target constituencies . There were more than 300 in total before this week’s general election call, and many of them have been there for a year or more. And they’ve been selected under new procedures adopted at Lib Dem Spring Conference in 2016, designed to deliberately promote the diversity of candidates in winnable seats

This includes mandating all-women shortlists when selecting candidates who are replacing sitting MPs, similar rules in our strongest electoral regions. In our top 10 per cent of constituencies, there is a requirement that at least two candidates are shortlisted from underrepresented groups on every list. We became the first party to reserve spaces on the shortlists of winnable seats for underrepresented candidates including women, BAME, LGBT+ and disabled candidates

It’s not going to be perfect - the hugely welcome return of Lib Dem grandees like Vince Cable, Ed Davey and Julian Huppert to their old stomping grounds will strengthen the party but not our gender imbalance. But excluding those former MPs coming back to the fray, every top 20 target constituency bar one has to date selected a female candidate.

Equality (together with liberty and community) is one of the three key values framed in the preamble to the Lib Dem constitution. It’s a relief that after this election, the Liberal Democratic party in the Commons will reflect that aspiration rather better than it has done in the past.

Richard Morris blogs at A View From Ham Common, which was named Best New Blog at the 2011 Lib Dem Conference

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