Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning’s papers.

1. We've avoided a Libyan Srebrenica, so when is the bombing going to stop? (Guardian)

When there was a clear and present danger, intervention was the right thing to do, writes Jonathan Freedland. But the threat is receding.

2. Mandela and Miliband. Spot the difference (Times) (£)

It was offensive and absurd for the Labour leader to compare the anti-cuts march to the struggles against apartheid or for civil rights, argues Daniel Finkelstein

3. Surgical financial strikes can oust Gaddafi (Financial Times)

Cash rewards could win over regime loyalists, writes Patrick Cronin.

4. The Fukushima effect, globally, will be colossal (Independent)

Hardly any new nuclear power stations will be approved in the next 20 years, says Hamish McRae.

5. Dodgy David Cameron steals from the poor to give to the rich (Daily Mirror)

The PM's fixation with abolishing the 50p tax rate exposes his true priorities, says Kevin Maguire.

6. Ed Miliband wrecks his reputation by siding with the criminal class (Daily Telegraph)

Unlike most of his parliamentary party, the Labour leader doesn't realise that capitalism and freedom have won, writes Simon Heffer.

7. Britain's universities must now declare their independence (Guardian)

Higher education should kick its addiction to state cash and call the coalition's bluff, argues Simon Jenkins.

8. Mogul's hidden hand keeps its grip on power (Independent)

The formation of the coalition should have been a huge setback to News International, writes Lance Price.

9. Earning a good reputation in business (Financial Times)

We can tackle bribery without hitting growth, writes Kenneth Clarke.

10. German elections: Green shoots (Guardian)

The German government faces a period of weakness at a time when Europe needs German strength, says a Guardian leader.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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