In this week’s New Statesman: toppling the tyrants

Olivier Roy: end of the Arab strongman | Laurie Penny: decoding the royal guest list | Will Self: wh

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In this week's New Statesman we look at how the Arab revolt is changing the world. In an exclusive essay for the NS, Olivier Roy, one of the world's leading experts on the Middle East, says that the ruling elites and religious reactionaries haven't yet grasped that the region's young people, restless and underemployed, will not be bought off by superficial reform.

Elsewhere, Lydia Ness reports from inside Libya and says that the events of the past week remind us that under Gaddafi, it has always been one of the most "murderous regimes in the world". Meanwhile, John Pilger argues that the revolt in the Arab world is also a protest against a "worldwide economic tyranny" designed by the US, and Mehdi Hasan analyses how David Cameron, like so many of his predecessors, has preached democracy while supporting autocracy.

Also this week, David Blanchflower says that America's "Tea Party of the left" is a warning to the coalition, the award-winning novelist Phil Whitaker, who is also a doctor, reflects on 30 years of upheaval in the NHS, and Laurie Penny decodes the royal wedding guest list.

All this, plus Ryan Gilbey reviews Animal Kingdom, Natasha Vargas-Cooper considers the British takeover of Hollywood, and Will Self explains why he loves Caffè Nero.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Tory Brexiter Daniel Hannan: Leave campaign never promised "radical decline" in immigration

The voters might not agree...

BBC Newsnight on Twitter

It was the Leave campaign's pledge to reduce EU immigration that won it the referendum. But Daniel Hannan struck a rather different tone on last night's Newsnight. "It means free movement of labour," the Conservative MEP said of the post-Brexit model he envisaged. An exasperated Evan Davis replied: “I’m sorry we’ve just been through three months of agony on the issue of immigration. The public have been led to believe that what they have voted for is an end to free movement." 

Hannan protested that EU migrants would lose "legal entitlements to live in other countries, to vote in other countries and to claim welfare and to have the same university tuition". But Davis wasn't backing down. "Why didn't you say this in the campaign? Why didn't you say in the campaign that you were wanting a scheme where we have free movement of labour? Come on, that's completely at odds with what the public think they have just voted for." 

Hannan concluded: "We never said there was going to be some radical decline ... we want a measure of control". Your Mole suspects many voters assumed otherwise. If immigration is barely changed, Hannan and others will soon be burned by the very fires they stoked. 

I'm a mole, innit.