In this week’s New Statesman: toppling the tyrants

Olivier Roy: end of the Arab strongman | Laurie Penny: decoding the royal guest list | Will Self: wh

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In this week's New Statesman we look at how the Arab revolt is changing the world. In an exclusive essay for the NS, Olivier Roy, one of the world's leading experts on the Middle East, says that the ruling elites and religious reactionaries haven't yet grasped that the region's young people, restless and underemployed, will not be bought off by superficial reform.

Elsewhere, Lydia Ness reports from inside Libya and says that the events of the past week remind us that under Gaddafi, it has always been one of the most "murderous regimes in the world". Meanwhile, John Pilger argues that the revolt in the Arab world is also a protest against a "worldwide economic tyranny" designed by the US, and Mehdi Hasan analyses how David Cameron, like so many of his predecessors, has preached democracy while supporting autocracy.

Also this week, David Blanchflower says that America's "Tea Party of the left" is a warning to the coalition, the award-winning novelist Phil Whitaker, who is also a doctor, reflects on 30 years of upheaval in the NHS, and Laurie Penny decodes the royal wedding guest list.

All this, plus Ryan Gilbey reviews Animal Kingdom, Natasha Vargas-Cooper considers the British takeover of Hollywood, and Will Self explains why he loves Caffè Nero.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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