Wyclef Jean’s contribution to the Egyptian revolution

Is the Haitian rapper the real reason behind Mubarak’s exit?

The Egyptian people triumphed today – but not without a little help from the former Fugees rapper and erstwhile Haitian presidential candidate, Wyclef Jean.

The rapper uploaded his song " 'Freedom' (Song for Egypt)" on to YouTube this morning. This afternoon, Hosni Mubarak stepped down. Coincidence?

After being barred from running for president of Haiti in 2010 because he was not a resident there, perhaps Jean will consider running to become president of his Egyptian "sisters and brothers".

From "La Marseillaise" to Bob Dylan's "Blowin' in the Wind", songs have the power to inspire protesters. Let's wait and see if the latest offering from Jean, a self-styled Bob Marley for the YouTube generation, will become the soundtrack to this revolution.

In the song, he sings of "the scars of courage" on the faces of his "sisters and brothers", and draws on Egypt's history:

If the pyramids could talk they probably would say we want freedom,
Cairo wants freedom, the youth want their freedom, they want a peaceful solution.
I see the camels in the desert,
But they don't have no riders . . .

He assures the Egyptian people:

Allah has not forgotten you, he is grateful.

Jean is no stranger to mixing politics and music. He has likened himself to the Haitian revolutionary Touissant l'Ouverture, saying, "Revolution is in my bloodline." When protest broke out in Egypt he changed his picture on Twitter to an Egyptian flag. Clearly, Mubarak was able to withstand the protests of thousands of his fellow Egyptians – but Wyclef's video proved too much . . .

Over in Tunisia, the rapper Hamada Ben-Amor released a song protesting at the rule of the then president, Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali. The video became a YouTube sensation as protests continued in the country. The 22-year-old was subsequently arrested, and the authorities refuse to comment on the situation.

 
If this has whetted your appetite for music that champions a cause, check out the New Statesman's top 20 political songs. For a slightly more serious analysis of Mubarak's exit, go here.

Photo: Getty
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The big problem for the NHS? Local government cuts

Even a U-Turn on planned cuts to the service itself will still leave the NHS under heavy pressure. 

38Degrees has uncovered a series of grisly plans for the NHS over the coming years. Among the highlights: severe cuts to frontline services at the Midland Metropolitan Hospital, including but limited to the closure of its Accident and Emergency department. Elsewhere, one of three hospitals in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland are to be shuttered, while there will be cuts to acute services in Suffolk and North East Essex.

These cuts come despite an additional £8bn annual cash injection into the NHS, characterised as the bare minimum needed by Simon Stevens, the head of NHS England.

The cuts are outlined in draft sustainability and transformation plans (STP) that will be approved in October before kicking off a period of wider consultation.

The problem for the NHS is twofold: although its funding remains ringfenced, healthcare inflation means that in reality, the health service requires above-inflation increases to stand still. But the second, bigger problem aren’t cuts to the NHS but to the rest of government spending, particularly local government cuts.

That has seen more pressure on hospital beds as outpatients who require further non-emergency care have nowhere to go, increasing lifestyle problems as cash-strapped councils either close or increase prices at subsidised local authority gyms, build on green space to make the best out of Britain’s booming property market, and cut other corners to manage the growing backlog of devolved cuts.

All of which means even a bigger supply of cash for the NHS than the £8bn promised at the last election – even the bonanza pledged by Vote Leave in the referendum, in fact – will still find itself disappearing down the cracks left by cuts elsewhere. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.