New book featuring NS contributors

<em>Fight Back! A Reader on the Winter of Protest</em> is free to download.

The first book on Britain's anti-cuts movement has been published by openDemocracy. Fight Back! A Reader on the Winter of Protest features a number of New Statesman contributors – Anthony Barnett, Rowenna Davis, Jeremy Gilbert, Dan Hancox, Johann Hari, Owen Hatherley, Laurie Penny and Daniel Trilling – and is now free to download as an e-book. More details from the publishers here:

In November 2010 opposition to the government's cuts exploded into direct action, as students stormed the Conservative Party HQ in Millbank.

A month later, Parliament Square itself was occupied, as 30,000 marched while the police protected the House of Commons, and later brutally "kettled" many of the young demonstrators.

Has a new movement been born? One which can even defeat the government?

Fight Back! the book features the best writing, blogs, articles, images and exchanges of two explosive months of action against the government's programme of cuts and student fees.

Its "editorial kettle" of seven are all under 30 and were all kettled by the police in November and December 2011.

Edited by the journalist Dan Hancox, others on the editorial team are Guy Aitchison, Laurie Penny, Siraj Datoo, Caillean Gallaghar, Aaron Peters and Paul Sagar.

The book brings together 43 contributors of all ages, from a 15-year-old UK Uncut activist to a rebel Lib Dem peer.

Fight Back! is published by openDemocracy's OurKingdom.

It will be published on 24 March as a book and on Kindle.

It can be downloaded now as a free e-book with no registration.

Ukip's Nigel Farage and Paul Nuttall. Photo: Getty
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Is the general election 2017 the end of Ukip?

Ukip led the way to Brexit, but now the party is on less than 10 per cent in the polls. 

Ukip could be finished. Ukip has only ever had two MPs, but it held an outside influence on politics: without it, we’d probably never have had the EU referendum. But Brexit has turned Ukip into a single-issue party without an issue. Ukip’s sole remaining MP, Douglas Carswell, left the party in March 2017, and told Sky News’ Adam Boulton that there was “no point” to the party anymore. 

Not everyone in Ukip has given up, though: Nigel Farage told Peston on Sunday that Ukip “will survive”, and current leader Paul Nuttall will be contesting a seat this year. But Ukip is standing in fewer constituencies than last time thanks to a shortage of both money and people. Who benefits if Ukip is finished? It’s likely to be the Tories. 

Is Ukip finished? 

What are Ukip's poll ratings?

Ukip’s poll ratings peaked in June 2016 at 16 per cent. Since the leave campaign’s success, that has steadily declined so that Ukip is going into the 2017 general election on 4 per cent, according to the latest polls. If the polls can be trusted, that’s a serious collapse.

Can Ukip get anymore MPs?

In the 2015 general election Ukip contested nearly every seat and got 13 per cent of the vote, making it the third biggest party (although is only returned one MP). Now Ukip is reportedly struggling to find candidates and could stand in as few as 100 seats. Ukip leader Paul Nuttall will stand in Boston and Skegness, but both ex-leader Nigel Farage and donor Arron Banks have ruled themselves out of running this time.

How many members does Ukip have?

Ukip’s membership declined from 45,994 at the 2015 general election to 39,000 in 2016. That’s a worrying sign for any political party, which relies on grassroots memberships to put in the campaigning legwork.

What does Ukip's decline mean for Labour and the Conservatives? 

The rise of Ukip took votes from both the Conservatives and Labour, with a nationalist message that appealed to disaffected voters from both right and left. But the decline of Ukip only seems to be helping the Conservatives. Stephen Bush has written about how in Wales voting Ukip seems to have been a gateway drug for traditional Labour voters who are now backing the mainstream right; so the voters Ukip took from the Conservatives are reverting to the Conservatives, and the ones they took from Labour are transferring to the Conservatives too.

Ukip might be finished as an electoral force, but its influence on the rest of British politics will be felt for many years yet. 

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