New book featuring NS contributors

<em>Fight Back! A Reader on the Winter of Protest</em> is free to download.

The first book on Britain's anti-cuts movement has been published by openDemocracy. Fight Back! A Reader on the Winter of Protest features a number of New Statesman contributors – Anthony Barnett, Rowenna Davis, Jeremy Gilbert, Dan Hancox, Johann Hari, Owen Hatherley, Laurie Penny and Daniel Trilling – and is now free to download as an e-book. More details from the publishers here:

In November 2010 opposition to the government's cuts exploded into direct action, as students stormed the Conservative Party HQ in Millbank.

A month later, Parliament Square itself was occupied, as 30,000 marched while the police protected the House of Commons, and later brutally "kettled" many of the young demonstrators.

Has a new movement been born? One which can even defeat the government?

Fight Back! the book features the best writing, blogs, articles, images and exchanges of two explosive months of action against the government's programme of cuts and student fees.

Its "editorial kettle" of seven are all under 30 and were all kettled by the police in November and December 2011.

Edited by the journalist Dan Hancox, others on the editorial team are Guy Aitchison, Laurie Penny, Siraj Datoo, Caillean Gallaghar, Aaron Peters and Paul Sagar.

The book brings together 43 contributors of all ages, from a 15-year-old UK Uncut activist to a rebel Lib Dem peer.

Fight Back! is published by openDemocracy's OurKingdom.

It will be published on 24 March as a book and on Kindle.

It can be downloaded now as a free e-book with no registration.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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