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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from the Sunday papers.

1. The Tories couldn't deliver the goods without the Lib Dems (Sunday Telegraph)

The Conservative right is wilfully blind to the fact that it is getting pretty much what it wants from a coalition that it hates, argues Matthew d'Ancona.

2. Bringing the bankers to heel must start right here, right now (Observer)

If Britain doesn't take a lead in controlling Big Finance, says Will Hutton, outrageous bonuses will carry on being paid and there will be another crisis.

3. Ed needs business more than big wins (Independent on Sunday)

The Lib Dems lost the Old & Sad by-election but claimed success. Labour won it but it's a terrible result for them, according to John Rentoul.

4. High taxes breed clever dodgers (Sunday Times) (£)

England's footballers, who rarely troubled opposition defences in the World Cup, are proving much more adept at outflanking the taxman, says a leading article.

5. Labour can only win if voters believe they're on the money (Observer)

The British public is not going to hand Labour the keys to No 10 until it restore its economic credibility, says Andrew Rawnsley.

6. What would be the impact of the Alternative Vote? (Sunday Telegraph)

Why are we having a referendum on AV? How does the voting system work? And is it fair? Tim Montgomerie reports.

7. Books for all, not just the wealthy (Independent on Sunday)

This leading article criticises cuts to public libraries, which will have a disproportionate effect on deprived areas.

8. Now we have two kinds of elderly (Sunday Times) (£)

Minette Marrin warns that as the elderly work for longer, two classes of old people will emerge – those who employers want and those who employers don't.

9. We can transform our countryside. Put forests in the hands of the people (Observer)

Andy Wightman maintains that a campaign to stop the government selling our woodlands misses a great chance to revolutionise their ownership.

10. Barack Obama captured the mood of a nation. Can David Cameron do the same? (Sunday Telegraph)

The president's speech in Tuscon showed the transforming power of language – a power that Cameron has so far been unable to master, argues Janet Daley.