The New Statesman’s rolling politics blog

RSS

Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from the Sunday papers.

1. The coalition counts on blaming Labour for everything. Bad move (Observer)

Rafael Behr notes that David Cameron's strategy depends on voters forgetting the good times, however illusory. But they won't.

2. Nick Clegg's Lords reforms could destroy the authority of the Commons (Sunday Telegraph)

The Deputy Prime Minister's passion for constitutional change has been written off as harmless Lib Dem pottiness – but it could do immense damage to our system of government, argues Peter Oborne.

3. Willetts banks on the silver vote (Independent on Sunday)

Many older people will gain under the coalition, and be unaffected by its most draconian measures, says John Rentoul.

4. That's our cash leaking from Ulster's pipes (Sunday Times)

Northern Ireland has more rainfall than most of the UK and it gets its water from a lake that is full at this time of year. So how did it run out of water?

5. What can David Cameron learn from Margaret Thatcher? (Sunday Telegraph)

The Iron Lady's reign could teach our Prime Minister a thing or two, believes Tim Montgomerie.

6. Who will confront the hatred in Hungary? (Observer)

The European Union seems happy to ignore the repression that is happening under Viktor Orbán, says Nick Cohen.

7. What's green about encouraging us to drive? (Independent on Sunday)

Steep fare increases today and an uncomfortable return to work on crowded trains will galvanise a rebellious new movement, says Alexandra Woodsworth.

8. You cannot hide, so fight the web spies (Sunday Times)

Jenni Russell argues that the technologies that exposed diplomats during the WikiLeaks revelations have the capacity to do the same to us, too.

9. My New Year's prediction: the coalition won't collapse – just be hated (Sunday Telegraph)

All the contortions and concessions required to keep the alliance going will lead to irreparable dissatisfaction, says Janet Daley.

10. Afghanistan: our mandate for action is finally exhausted (Observer)

This editorial argues that we will be withdrawing our troops not because we have won or lost in any conventional sense.