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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning’s papers.

1. Free speech can't exist unchained. US politics needs the tonic of order (Guardian)

Simon Jenkins argues that if America is to speak in a way that heals, as Barack Obama wishes, it needs the curbs and regulations that make freedom of expression real.

2. These UCTs could be a real technical breakthrough (Times) (£)

The right's snobbish elitism and the left's patronising anti-elitism failed generations at school. Now, says Philip Collins, we can put it right.

3. Australia is still the lucky country (Independent)

Amid the floods, says Terence Blacker, neighbours have helped each other out and people remain stoical, even amid the wreckage of their homes.

4. The risks of raising interest rates too quickly (Financial Times)

Should the Bank of England tighten now in response to a possible overshoot of its target two years hence? No, says Martin Wolf.

5. Mervyn King must hold his nerve (Guardian)

The Bank of England was right, says Larry Elliott. Even with inflation, interest-rate rises would be a monumental blunder.

6. The only way to save the euro is the destruction of its members (Daily Telegraph)

Britain beware – European integration has reached a dangerous tipping point, writes Peter Oborne.

7. We've never been better able to feed the world (Times) (£)

Forget scare stories about rising population and record food prices, says Matt Ridley – we can now grow more crops on less land.

8. A stark lesson for ageing Arab autocrats (Financial Times)

Claire Spencer suggests that the region's leaders lack national narratives that they can use to justify repression.

9. Richard Holbrooke's true memorial would be a lasting peace in Afghanistan (Daily Telegraph)

There are worrying reports of the insurgency mutating into global jihadism, writes David Miliband.

10. The Lib Dems will gain strength through weakness (Guardian)

In coalition, small parties are offered concessions, says Martin Kettle. And in the modern world of fairness and volatility, they can thrive.