Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning’s papers.

1. Clinton is proving that a feminist foreign policy is possible – and works (Guardian)

The US secretary of state has placed women's needs at the heart of US thinking about long-term security, says Madeleine Bunting.

2. Watch out, Dave. Red Ed's making a cynical grab for your Big Society (Daily Mail)

Miliband speaks the language of "small-c conservatism" but his promotion of "community organisers" is an attempt to subvert western values, argues Melanie Phillips.

3. A daft way to tackle America's debt (Financial Times)

The Republicans need to moderate their zeal to cut spending too much and too soon, says Clive Crook.

4. Getting beaten up in cyberspace does no one much harm (Daily Telegraph)

The internet has enabled journalists to be held accountable by their readers, writes Boris Johnson.

5. John Maynard Keynes: the master and the doctor (Guardian)

Vince Cable provides better intellectual cover for coalition economics than David Cameron, says a Guardian editorial.

6. Tunisia heralds a long battle for Arab reform (Financial Times)

A slow transformation of much of the rest of the Arab world is likely to follow, writes Rami Khouri.

7. Britain will suffer if it doesn't help the euro (Times) (£)

We're all in the European debt crisis together, like it or not, writes Bill Emmott. The Prime Minister doesn't seem to realise this.

8. The Tory embrace may well split the Lib Dems in two (Guardian)

Many social democrats can't stand what is happening to their party and will be tempted by Ed Miliband's repositioning of Labour, writes Jackie Ashley.

9. It's not only the old who are getting bullied off the screen (Independent)

The case of Miriam O'Reilly remind us that foolish and obtuse decisions are made every day by those in charge, says Yasmin Alibhai-Brown.

10. Not even Silvio can get away with this (Independent)

Even for the oh-so-broad-minded Italians, Berlusconi's exploits are becoming a bit creepy, writes Peter Popham.

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Children from "just managing" families most excluded from grammar schools

Shadow education secretary Angela Rayner said grammar schools "offer nothing to most kids".

Children from "just about managing" families are unlikely to benefit from an expansion of grammar schools because they don't get accepted in the first place, research from the Sutton Trust has found.

The educational charity also found that disadvantaged white British pupils were the least likely among a range of ethnic groups to get access to elite state school education. 

Shadow education secretary Angela Rayner said: “The Tories are failing our children. They should be delivering a country that works for everyone but all they have to offer is a plan to build an education system that only helps a handful of already privileged children.

"The evidence is clear - grammar schools reinforce advantage and offer nothing to most kids."

Theresa May launched her premiership with both a pledge to make Britain work for the "just managing" families (consequently termed Jams), and a promise to consider expanding grammar schools. 

The Sutton Trust researchers used the Income Deprivation Affecting Children index to compare access rates to those defined "just about managing" by the Resolution Foundation. 

They found that even non-disadvantaged pupils living in deprived neighbourhoods are barely more likely to attend grammar schools than those in the poorest. The report stated: "This is a strong indication that the ‘just managing’ families are not being catered for by the current grammar school system."

The Sutton Trust also found different ethnic groups benefited differently from grammar schools.

Disadvantaged Black pupils made up just 0.8 per cent of pupils in 2016, while disadvantaged white British pupils made up roughly 0.7 per cent, although disadvantaged white non-British children fared slightly better. Among disadvantaged groups, Asian pupils made up a substantial proportion of grammar school pupils. 

Sutton Trust chairman Sir Peter Lampl said: “Today’s research raises concerns about the government’s plans to use new grammars as a vehicle for social mobility. We need to get existing grammars moving in the right direction before we consider expanding their number.”

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.