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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning’s papers.

1. Tory free-market hurricane will blow our NHS apart (Guardian)

David Cameron's silken words won't hide the grim truth, writes Polly Toynbee. This week's Health and Social Care Bill will turn a unified health service into a purchasing agency.

2. The last thing the NHS needs is more reform (Daily Mirror)

Cameron promised to protect health service spending and to avoid "top-down reorganisations". He is about to break both promises, says Robert Winston.

3. Rushed reform can seriously damage health (Times) (£)

Even Cameron is jittery about his Health Secretary's plan to "throw a hand grenade" into the NHS, writes Rachel Sylvester.

4. US democracy has little to teach China (Financial Times)

The American system shows little appetite for dealing with long-term fiscal challenges, writes Francis Fukuyama.

5. A dangerous liaison for Cameron – an emerging Lib-Lab pact (Daily Telegraph)

Relations between Ed Miliband and Nick Clegg – and their parties – are thawing rapidly, says Mary Riddell.

6. "Alarm Clock Britain" is the new political label for hard-working ordinary people. How patronising (Daily Mail)

If you exclude rock stars and the unemployed, it's hard to think of anyone who is not an Alarm Clock Hero, writes John Humphrys.

7. Eco-terrorism: the non-existent threat we spend millions policing (Guardian)

Acpo is a state-sanctioned private militia, fighting public protest on behalf of corporations, writes George Monbiot.

8. A revolution that shows Cameron in his true colours (Independent)

Approve or disapprove of the coalition's reforms, the new health policy marks the end of the NHS, says Steve Richards.

9. Beijing feels that time is on its side (Financial Times)

Post-crisis, Americans are taking a less benign view of China, writes Gideon Rachman.

10. Yes, bonuses do work – but for fruit-pickers, not City bankers (Guardian)

The justification that banks need to fork out huge payouts to retain top talent is a fallacy, argues Aditya Chakrabortty.