100 days of Ed Miliband: the defining moments

The key points from Miliband’s first 100 days as Labour leader.

Best moment: Miliband's clear and persuasive opposition to the abolition of universal child benefit. It ensured that his first PMQs was a success and allowed him to assert his social-democratic credentials. With the Treasury warning that the planned benefit cuts are "unenforceable", Miliband's opposition may yet pay dividends.

Worst moment: The Labour leader was humiliated when David Cameron declared: "I'd rather be a child of Thatcher than a son of Brown." It was the defining moment of what proved to be his worst week as leader.

Best line: "I was a student politician, but I wasn't hanging around with people who were throwing bread rolls and wrecking restaurants." (To David Cameron at PMQs on 8 December)

Worst line: "I think I was doing something else at the time, actually." (On why he missed the students' protest)

Best joke: "If the Kremlin is spying on the Lib Dems, I'm not surprised. They want a bit of light relief." (At PMQs in response to the Mike Hancock story)

Worst joke: "I stole David's football, so he nationalised my train set." (In his party conference speech)

Least loyal shadow minister: Alan Johnson wins this one by a country mile. His sustained opposition to a graduate tax and to a permanent 50p income-tax rate represented the most serious challenge to Miliband's authority. The shadow chancellor eventually climbed down and suggested that there was a "strong case" for graduate tax, albeit in the most unconvincing way possible. But the damage had been done and the confusion meant Labour could offer only token opposition to higher tuition fees.

Highest Labour poll rating: 43 per cent (YouGov/Sun poll, 20 December)

Lowest Labour poll rating: 34 per cent (ComRes/Independent on Sunday, 15 October)

And finally . . . Best line borrowed from an NS comment thread: "He wished he could come back and say No, No No, but in his case it's a bit more like No, Maybe, Oh go on then." (On David Cameron and the EU budget. Hats off to Bill Kristol-Balls)

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Brexit would jeopardise the rights of working women

Europe isn’t perfect, but without it millions of women and millions of trade unionists would be at risk of Tory deregulation. 

One of the most important arguments in favour of staying in the EU is the protections that membership affords working people.

Whether it’s equal rights for part-time workers, the agency workers directive or limits on the length of the working week, we all owe the European Union and its Social Charter – campaigned for by a generation of trade unionists from across the continent – a great deal.

Outside of Europe British workers would find themselves worse off both in terms of their pay packets and the rights that they rely on. Add to that the reality that outside the EU risks being a place with lower public spending thanks to a troubled economy and rising privatisation of our public services, you can understand why the vast majority of British trade unions are recommending that their members vote to remain.

And for working women, the choice is starker still, because women have that much more to lose when rights and protections are stripped from the workplace.

Just think what EU law guarantees for all working people through the social charter, and how losing these rights (and putting the Brexit bunch in charge) would impact on things we’ve all come to rely on like maternity pay and guaranteed holiday pay.

Think about how much harder the struggle for equal pay will be if it’s not underpinned by EU law.

Think about how a Boris Johnson led Tory government – outside of Europe, on the fringes of global influence and under increasing pressure from UKIP to withdraw even further from the modern world – would attack your working conditions.

The Tory right – fresh from dragging our country out of Europe and away from regulations that help keep us safe at work aren’t going to stop there. Their next port of call will be other sources of what they deem “red tape” – like equal rights legislation that helps ensure women have all the same opportunities afforded to their male colleagues.

That’s something that matters to me as a trade unionist and as a woman.

It’s something that matters to me as Assistant General Secretary of a union with more than a million female members – UNISON, the biggest membership organisation for women in the country.

It matters to me as President of the TUC – when most trade unionists are women and when we have the first female TUC General Secretary in Frances O’Grady.

But most of all it matters to me because of the stories of all of the women I’ve met and am proud to represent who benefit every single day from Europe-wide protection of their rights.

What we face is the risk of losing those rights to a cynical and desperate campaign based around false promises and rhetoric from the Brexiteers. What we need in this campaign is some straightforward honesty. So here’s my position in a single sentence: Europe isn’t perfect, but without it millions of women and millions of trade unionists would be at risk.

I won’t stand for that. Neither should you. And neither should they either.

Liz Snape is Assistant General Secretary of UNISON and President of the TUC