Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning’s papers.

1. Only a merger with the Tories will save most Liberal Democrat MPs (Daily Telegraph)

A merger between the Tories and the Lib Dems is increasingly likely, writes Fraser Nelson. Yet, to most Tory MPs, the idea is anathema.

2. For Labour, moral outrage is not enough (Guardian)

Just shouting more loudly about every cut risks confining Labour to comfortable irrelevance, says Douglas Alexander.

3. Go on, Mr Cameron. Dare to be an optimist (Times) (£)

Smarter children, longer lives, less crime: the "politics of optimism" could transform Britain, argues Anthony Seldon.

4. Ken Clarke says prison doesn't work. Little wonder when they're holiday camps like this one (Daily Mail)

The inmates at Ford Open Prison have been indulged by the authorities, says Stephen Glover.

5. Liberalism still has a place in penal policy (Independent)

But elsewhere, an Independent leader argues that the riot should not be used as an excuse by the coalition to revert to counterproductive policies.

6. Pungent, angry and decisive: Margaret Thatcher still dominates the Tory party (Guardian)

Conservative rebels, who still regard Cameron as a fake, see Thatcher as their spiritual leader, writes Jackie Ashley.

7. Remembering an unsung heroine of our modern history (Independent)

The workers' rights activist Jayaben Desa must be honoured by those of us who knew her, says Yasmin Alibhai-Brown.

8. Parking fees that put the boot into business (Daily Telegraph)

Shoppers will be driven out of town if asked to pay more to park their cars, argues Philip Johnston.

9. Why sequels will not come first this year (Guardian)

Films such as The King's Speech and 127 Hours suggest that cinema has a bright future, writes Mark Lawson.

10. Heads have to consider the majority of pupils (Daily Telegraph)

British schools must have the wherewithal to deal with unruly pupils properly, argues a Daily Telegraph leader.

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5 things Labour has blamed for the Copeland by-election defeat

Other than Labour, of course. 

In the early hours of Friday morning, Labour activists in Copeland received a crushing blow, when they lost a long-held constituency to the Tories

As the news sank in, everyone from the leadership down began sharing their views on what went wrong. 

Some Labour MPs who had done the door knock rounds acknowledged voters felt the party was divided, and were confused about its leadership.

But others had more imaginative reasons for defeat:

1. Tony Blair

Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell told Radio 4’s Today programme that: “I don’t think it’s about individuals”. But he then laid into Tony Blair, saying: “We can’t have a circumstance again where a week before the by-election a former leader of the party attacks the party itself.”

2. Marginal seats

In a flurry of tweets, shadow Justice secretary Richard Burgon wanted everyone to know that Copeland was a marginal seat and always had been since it was created in 1983.

Which might be true, but most commentators were rather more struck by the fact Labour MPs had managed to overcome that marginality and represent the area for eighty years. 

3. The nuclear industry

In response to the defeat, Corbyn loyalist Paul Flynn tweeted: “Copeland MP is pro-nuclear right winger. No change there.” He added that Copeland was a “unique pro-nuclear seat”. 

In fact, when The New Statesman visited Copeland, we found residents far more concerned about the jobs the nuclear industry provides than any evangelical fervour for splitting atoms.

4. The political establishment

Addressing journalists the day after the defeat, Corbyn said voters were “let down by the political establishment”. So let down, they voted for the party of government.

He also blamed the “corporate controlled media”. 

5. Brexit

Corbyn's erstwhile rival Owen Smith tweeted that the defeat was "more evidence of the electoral foolhardiness of Labour chasing Brexiteers down the rabbit hole". It's certainly the case that Brexit hasn't been kind to Labour's share of the vote in Remain-voting by-elections like Richmond. But more than 56 per cent of Cumbrians voted Leave, and in Copeland the percentage was the highest, at 62 per cent. That's an awful lot of Brexiteers not to chase...

I'm a mole, innit.