Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning’s papers.

1. Only a merger with the Tories will save most Liberal Democrat MPs (Daily Telegraph)

A merger between the Tories and the Lib Dems is increasingly likely, writes Fraser Nelson. Yet, to most Tory MPs, the idea is anathema.

2. For Labour, moral outrage is not enough (Guardian)

Just shouting more loudly about every cut risks confining Labour to comfortable irrelevance, says Douglas Alexander.

3. Go on, Mr Cameron. Dare to be an optimist (Times) (£)

Smarter children, longer lives, less crime: the "politics of optimism" could transform Britain, argues Anthony Seldon.

4. Ken Clarke says prison doesn't work. Little wonder when they're holiday camps like this one (Daily Mail)

The inmates at Ford Open Prison have been indulged by the authorities, says Stephen Glover.

5. Liberalism still has a place in penal policy (Independent)

But elsewhere, an Independent leader argues that the riot should not be used as an excuse by the coalition to revert to counterproductive policies.

6. Pungent, angry and decisive: Margaret Thatcher still dominates the Tory party (Guardian)

Conservative rebels, who still regard Cameron as a fake, see Thatcher as their spiritual leader, writes Jackie Ashley.

7. Remembering an unsung heroine of our modern history (Independent)

The workers' rights activist Jayaben Desa must be honoured by those of us who knew her, says Yasmin Alibhai-Brown.

8. Parking fees that put the boot into business (Daily Telegraph)

Shoppers will be driven out of town if asked to pay more to park their cars, argues Philip Johnston.

9. Why sequels will not come first this year (Guardian)

Films such as The King's Speech and 127 Hours suggest that cinema has a bright future, writes Mark Lawson.

10. Heads have to consider the majority of pupils (Daily Telegraph)

British schools must have the wherewithal to deal with unruly pupils properly, argues a Daily Telegraph leader.

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Who will win in Manchester Gorton?

Will Labour lose in Manchester Gorton?

The death of Gerald Kaufman will trigger a by-election in his Manchester Gorton seat, which has been Labour-held since 1935.

Coming so soon after the disappointing results in Copeland – where the seat was lost to the Tories – and Stoke – where the party lost vote share – some overly excitable commentators are talking up the possibility of an upset in the Manchester seat.

But Gorton is very different to Stoke-on-Trent and to Copeland. The Labour lead is 56 points, compared to 16.5 points in Stoke-on-Trent and 6.5 points in Copeland. (As I’ve written before and will doubtless write again, it’s much more instructive to talk about vote share rather than vote numbers in British elections. Most of the country tends to vote in the same way even if they vote at different volumes.)

That 47 per cent of the seat's residents come from a non-white background and that the Labour party holds every council seat in the constituency only adds to the party's strong position here. 

But that doesn’t mean that there is no interest to be had in the contest at all. That the seat voted heavily to remain in the European Union – around 65 per cent according to Chris Hanretty’s estimates – will provide a glimmer of hope to the Liberal Democrats that they can finish a strong second, as they did consistently from 1992 to 2010, before slumping to fifth in 2015.

How they do in second place will inform how jittery Labour MPs with smaller majorities and a history of Liberal Democrat activity are about Labour’s embrace of Brexit.

They also have a narrow chance of becoming competitive should Labour’s selection turn acrimonious. The seat has been in special measures since 2004, which means the selection will be run by the party’s national executive committee, though several local candidates are tipped to run, with Afzal Khan,  a local MEP, and Julie Reid, a local councillor, both expected to run for the vacant seats.

It’s highly unlikely but if the selection occurs in a way that irritates the local party or provokes serious local in-fighting, you can just about see how the Liberal Democrats give everyone a surprise. But it’s about as likely as the United States men landing on Mars any time soon – plausible, but far-fetched. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.