Cameron refuses to deny Coulson resignation offer

PM insists Coulson is doing a “good job” but refuses to comment on resignation rumours.

David Cameron's appearance on this morning's Today programme was most notable for his refusal to deny that Andy Coulson has offered his resignation. "I don't go into private conversations," was all the Prime Minister would say when pressed by John Humphrys.

Elsewhere, Cameron offered his standard "everyone deserves a second chance" defence of Coulson. The former News of the World editor may have taken ultimate responsibility and resigned from the tabloid – how could he not? – but there are still unanswered questions over the phone-hacking scandal.

Cameron's communications chief maintains that he had no knowledge of the affair and that the former royal editor Clive Goodman, jailed in 2007 for hacking into the phones of royal staff, was the only reporter involved. But this "rotten apples" excuse has been repeatedly undermined by new evidence. Most significantly, in a recent Channel 4 Dispatches investigation (presented by that notable Labour stooge, Peter Oborne), a former senior NoW journalist revealed that Coulson had personally listened to intercepted voicemail messages.

He told the programme:

Sometimes, they would say: "We've got a recording," and Andy would say: "OK, bring it into my office and play it to me" or "Bring me, email me a transcript of it".

In any case, as I have repeatedly pointed out, if Coulson did know about the scandal then he's too wicked to stay in his post, and if he didn't know then he's too stupid. Cameron is right; everyone does deserve a second chance – but not until they've fully atoned for their original sins.

As Steve Hilton is said to be arguing in private, Coulson's continued presence in No 10 makes a mockery of Cameron's claim to have turned his back on the sleaze of the New Labour era.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.