Murdoch eyes the prize as BSkyB profits soar

BSkyB profits up 26 per cent as Murdoch remains in London to negotiate with Culture Secretary.

As Rupert Murdoch remains in London to lead negotiations personally with Jeremy Hunt over News Corp's attempted takeover of BSkyB, here's a reminder of why he's so keen to seal the deal.

BSkyB has today announced that profits rose by 26 per cent to £467m in the last six months of 2010, with revenues up 15 per cent to £3.2bn. Sky has also now passed its target of ten million subscribers, set by James Murdoch in August 2004, when subscriber numbers were at 7.4 million. The graph I've put together below, based on data from Enders Analysis, shows what a full merger between News International and the broadcaster would mean for media plurality.

Media companies by revenue

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In revenue terms, BSkyB is already the country's largest broadcaster, with an annual income of £5.4bn, comfortably ahead of the BBC (£3.6bn). A pair-up between News International and BSkyB (Murdoch at present owns a 39 per cent stake) would produce a UK media company with revenues of £6.4bn.

As Mark Thompson argued in his impressive MacTaggart Lecture, Murdoch's bid, if successful, would lead to a "concentration of cross-media ownership" that would be unacceptable in the United States or Australia, News Corp's other two key markets. Once the deal is complete, we can expect Murdoch to bundle his newspapers with Sky subscriptions in an attempt to offset falling circulation.

As the media analyst Claire Enders has predicted, by the middle of this decade, the News Corp head could control 50 per cent of the newspaper and television markets, a concentration of ownership that would make even Silvio Berlusconi blush. Regardless of the "undertakings" Murdoch is expected to offer to Hunt, there is an unarguable case for referring the bid to the Competition Commission.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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How Theresa May laid a trap for herself on the immigration target

When Home Secretary, she insisted on keeping foreign students in the figures – causing a headache for herself today.

When Home Secretary, Theresa May insisted that foreign students should continue to be counted in the overall immigration figures. Some cabinet colleagues, including then Business Secretary Vince Cable and Chancellor George Osborne wanted to reverse this. It was economically illiterate. Current ministers, like the Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, Chancellor Philip Hammond and Home Secretary Amber Rudd, also want foreign students exempted from the total.

David Cameron’s government aimed to cut immigration figures – including overseas students in that aim meant trying to limit one of the UK’s crucial financial resources. They are worth £25bn to the UK economy, and their fees make up 14 per cent of total university income. And the impact is not just financial – welcoming foreign students is diplomatically and culturally key to Britain’s reputation and its relationship with the rest of the world too. Even more important now Brexit is on its way.

But they stayed in the figures – a situation that, along with counterproductive visa restrictions also introduced by May’s old department, put a lot of foreign students off studying here. For example, there has been a 44 per cent decrease in the number of Indian students coming to Britain to study in the last five years.

Now May’s stubbornness on the migration figures appears to have caught up with her. The Times has revealed that the Prime Minister is ready to “soften her longstanding opposition to taking foreign students out of immigration totals”. It reports that she will offer to change the way the numbers are calculated.

Why the u-turn? No 10 says the concession is to ensure the Higher and Research Bill, key university legislation, can pass due to a Lords amendment urging the government not to count students as “long-term migrants” for “public policy purposes”.

But it will also be a factor in May’s manifesto pledge (and continuation of Cameron’s promise) to cut immigration to the “tens of thousands”. Until today, ministers had been unclear about whether this would be in the manifesto.

Now her u-turn on student figures is being seized upon by opposition parties as “massaging” the migration figures to meet her target. An accusation for which May only has herself, and her steadfast politicising of immigration, to blame.

Anoosh Chakelian is senior writer at the New Statesman.

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