George Osborne: bonuses will make the credit crunch worse

The Chancellor’s tough words in opposition are all but forgotten as the government backs away from c

David Cameron has pulled back from curbs on bankers' bonuses or a tax on the banks, according to reports this morning (£).

The Centre for Economics and Business Research predicts that bankers will receive £7bn for 2010, down from £7.3bn for 2009 – a difference that will appear negligible to most of the public, and insulting as the rest of the population faces pay freezes, wage cuts and redundancies.

This backtracking from any serious confrontation over the banks is being portrayed as a blow to Vince Cable and Nick Clegg, both of whom have been vocal advocates of a clampdown on bonuses.

Yet it was not just the Liberal Democrats who were noisy critics of bonus culture while in opposition. Here is George Osborne, speaking in October 2009:

I am today calling on the Treasury and the FSA [Financial Services Authority] to combine forces and stop retail banks – in other words the banks that lend directly to businesses and families – paying out profits in significant cash bonuses. Full stop.

Strangely enough, now that he is in power, the Chancellor seems somewhat less concerned about taking this urgent action.

He and Cable are said to be working on a face-saving deal to be announced in the next month. It will focus on greater transparency, and on increasing lending to first-time buyers and small businesses. The strategic shift in emphasis away from clamping down on bonuses and towards more lending is misleading.

In fact, Osborne also had some thoughts on this, in the same 2009 speech:

It was a year ago that I first warned that the money taxpayers provided to support bank lending must not be diverted into bonuses. A year later, the banks are making billions in subsidised profits.

But instead of using these profits to lend more and get credit flowing again, the banks are threatening to pay out billions in cash bonuses instead. If this happens it will make the credit crunch worse.

We need to take emergency steps to support bank lending and move the economy forward this winter. The banks have to understand that we are all in this together.

Yes. Quite.

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

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Will Jeremy Corbyn stand down if Labour loses the general election?

Defeat at the polls might not be the end of Corbyn’s leadership.

The latest polls suggest that Labour is headed for heavy defeat in the June general election. Usually a general election loss would be the trigger for a leader to quit: Michael Foot, Gordon Brown and Ed Miliband all stood down after their first defeat, although Neil Kinnock saw out two losses before resigning in 1992.

It’s possible, if unlikely, that Corbyn could become prime minister. If that prospect doesn’t materialise, however, the question is: will Corbyn follow the majority of his predecessors and resign, or will he hang on in office?

Will Corbyn stand down? The rules

There is no formal process for the parliamentary Labour party to oust its leader, as it discovered in the 2016 leadership challenge. Even after a majority of his MPs had voted no confidence in him, Corbyn stayed on, ultimately winning his second leadership contest after it was decided that the current leader should be automatically included on the ballot.

This year’s conference will vote on to reform the leadership selection process that would make it easier for a left-wing candidate to get on the ballot (nicknamed the “McDonnell amendment” by centrists): Corbyn could be waiting for this motion to pass before he resigns.

Will Corbyn stand down? The membership

Corbyn’s support in the membership is still strong. Without an equally compelling candidate to put before the party, Corbyn’s opponents in the PLP are unlikely to initiate another leadership battle they’re likely to lose.

That said, a general election loss could change that. Polling from March suggests that half of Labour members wanted Corbyn to stand down either immediately or before the general election.

Will Corbyn stand down? The rumours

Sources close to Corbyn have said that he might not stand down, even if he leads Labour to a crushing defeat this June. They mention Kinnock’s survival after the 1987 general election as a precedent (although at the 1987 election, Labour did gain seats).

Will Corbyn stand down? The verdict

Given his struggles to manage his own MPs and the example of other leaders, it would be remarkable if Corbyn did not stand down should Labour lose the general election. However, staying on after a vote of no-confidence in 2016 was also remarkable, and the mooted changes to the leadership election process give him a reason to hold on until September in order to secure a left-wing succession.

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