Teaching Miss Middleton

Will Andrew Roberts be giving lessons to a future queen?

Yesterday, Johann Hari sent a dramatic message on Twitter:

Kate Middleton is being advised by a far right-winger who blames concentration camp victims for their own deaths.

This linked to the following on Hari's own blog, which stated:

It has been revealed that a far right-winger who blames concentration camps victims for their own deaths is giving history lessons to Britain's future queen, Kate Middleton. Rod Liddle discloses in passing here that Andrew Roberts is "tutoring" her in the run-up to the royal wedding. To find out just who this "historian" is, read my exposé of him here. If Kate plays close attention to her new teacher's lessons, we can expect the wedding to be livened up by declarations that massacring unarmed civilians is "necessary" . . .

The semi-humorous Rod Liddle piece to which Hari linked in support of this news stated:

The historian Andrew Roberts is to give Kate a lesson in the history of the House of Windsor. "Mainly German and not terribly bright" should do it, I would have thought.

It appears that Liddle's intended meaning was that the first sentence was correct and the second sentence was a mirthful exaggeration or gloss.

However, it currently appears the only source for the Liddle assertion was in turn a parody piece by "Talbot Church" in the Independent of a couple of weeks earlier:

Mindful that not everyone knows the proud history of the royal family, aides have asked pint-sized historian Andrew Roberts to talk the bride-to-be through the history of the House of Windsor.

There appears to be no other published source.

So, is Andrew Roberts to be providing tuition to Kate Middleton?

I asked Clarence House, which categorically denied that Roberts had been asked or would be asked.

A royal aide told me:

Andrew Roberts has not been invited to give constitutional history or other lessons to Miss Middleton. There are no plans to approach Andrew Roberts.

Clarence House also asked me to state:

Prince William's private office will organise a series of private meetings with key individuals for Miss Middleton to meet both before and after the marriage, with regard [to] preparing her to become a member of the royal family. These will include senior members of the royal household, key advisers to Prince William and Prince Harry, and representatives from some of Prince William's charities and other affiliations.

I also asked Andrew Roberts, via his agent, but have so far had no reply.

So, what is correct?

Will the historian Andrew Roberts be giving tuition to Kate Middleton, as Hari and Liddle confidently assert?

Or was Hari's worrying tweet based only on a semi-parody, which was in turn derived from a parody in Hari's very own newspaper?

Could Johann Hari and Rod Liddle really have got something like this wrong?

Who knows?

But I offer a royal wedding commemorative mug to the first person who can evidence the news that Andrew Roberts is to give such tuition.

UPDATE: Andrew Roberts has now also categorically denied the appointment.

FURTHER UPDATE: Johann Hari now admits that his tweet and blog post were based on a factual error and that Andrew Roberts was never invited to tutor Kate Middleton.

David Allen Green is legal correspondent of the New Statesman.

David Allen Green is legal correspondent of the New Statesman and author of the Jack of Kent blog.

His legal journalism has included popularising the Simon Singh libel case and discrediting the Julian Assange myths about his extradition case.  His uncovering of the Nightjack email hack by the Times was described as "masterly analysis" by Lord Justice Leveson.

David is also a solicitor and was successful in the "Twitterjoketrial" appeal at the High Court.

(Nothing on this blog constitutes legal advice.)

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Theresa May's cabinet regroups: 11 things we know about Brexit negotiations so far

The new PM wants a debate on social mobility and Brexit. 

This was the summer of the Phony Brexit. But on Wednesday, the new Tory cabinet emerged from their holiday hideaways to discuss how Britain will negotiate its exit from the EU. 

The new prime minister Theresa May is hosting a meeting that includes Brexiteers like David Davis, now minister for Brexit, Boris Johnson, the new Foreign secretary, and Liam Fox.

For now, their views on negotiations are taking place behind closed doors at the PM’s country retreat, Chequers. But here is what we know so far:

1. Talks won’t begin this year

May said in July that official negotiations would not start in 2016. Instead, she pledged to take the time to secure “a sensible and orderly departure”. 

2. But forget a second referendum

In her opening speech to cabinet, May said: “We must continue to be very clear that ‘Brexit means Brexit’, that we’re going to make a success of it. That means there’s no second referendum; no attempts to sort of stay in the EU by the back door; that we’re actually going to deliver on this.”

3. And Article 50 remains mysterious

A No.10 spokesman has confirmed that Parliament will “have its say” but did not clarify whether this would be before or after Article 50 is triggered. According to The Telegraph, May has been told she has the authority to invoke it without a vote in Parliament, although she has confirmed she will not do so this eyar.

4. The cabinet need to speak up

May’s “you break it, you fix it” approach to cabinet appointments means that key Brexiteers are now in charge of overseeing affected areas, such as farming and international relations. According to the BBC, the PM is asking each minister to report back on opportunities for their departments. 

5. Brexit comes with social mobility

As well as Brexit, May is discussing social reform with her cabinet. She told them: “We want to be a government and a country that works for everyone.” The PM already performed some social mobility of her own, when she ditched public school boy Chancellor George Osborne in favour of state school Philip Hammond. 

6. All eyes will be on DExEU

Davis, aka Brexit minister, heads up the Department for Exiting the EU, a new ministerial department. According to Oliver Ilott, from the Institute for Government, this department will be responsible for setting the ground rules across Whitehall. He  said: “DExEu needs to make sure that there is a shared understanding of the parameters of future negotiations before Whitehall departments go too far down their own rabbit holes.”

7. May wants to keep it friendly

The PM talked to Prime Minister Sipilä of Finland and Prime Minister Solberg of Norway on the morning of the cabinet meeting. She pledged Britain would "live up to our obligations" in the EU while it remained a member and "maintain a good relationship with the EU as well as individual European countries".

8. But everything's on the table

May also told the Finnish and Norwegian prime ministers that negotiators should consider what is going to work best for the UK and what is going to work for the European Union, rather than necessarily pursuing an existing model. This suggests she may not be aiming to join Norway in the European Economic Area. 

9. She gets on with Angela Merkel

While all 27 remaining EU countries will have a say in Brexit negotiations, Germany is Europe’s economic powerhouse. May’s first meeting appeared amiable, with the PM telling reporters: “We have two women here who have got on and had a very constructive discussion, two women who, I may say, get on with the job.” The German Chancellor responded: “Exactly. I completely agree with that.”

10. But less so with Francoise Hollande

The French president said Brexit negotiations should start “the sooner the better” and argued that freedom of labour could not be separated from other aspects of the single market. 

11. Britain wants to hold onto its EU banking passports

The “passporting system” which makes it easier for banks based in London to operate on the Continent, is now in jeopardy. We know the UK Government will be fighting to keep passports, because a paper on that very issue was accidentally shown to camera.