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CommentPlus: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning’s papers.

1. Like Canute, we can't turn back the WikiTide (Times) (£)

The history of the human race shows that information will always spread as power shifts from group to group, says Daniel Finkelstein.

2. WikiLeaks – Mervyn King is consistently wrong: now his hawkish dogma has been exposed (Guardian)

Polly Toynbee writes about how WikiLeaks has exposed the Bank of England governor's central role in pushing an agenda of harsh cuts on successive governments.

3. Secrecy makes the world go round (Financial TImes)

WikiLeaks risks forgetting the value of diplomatic "back channels", warns Robert Baer. Secrecy has its drawbacks, but sometimes there is no choice.

4. WikiLeaks: Do they have a right to privacy? (Daily Telegraph)

The candid diplomatic information revealed by WikiLeaks is embarrassing, but it could also cause real harm, says Malcolm Rifkind.

5. We need to save more lives – with less (Independent)

Bill Clinton warns that momentum in the fight against Aids will be lost unless new ways are found to fill gaps left by funding cuts.

6. Liberal Democrats: the student debt trap (Guardian)

This leading article says that graduates are less vulnerable than the frail and impoverished, but the indignation of students who took to the streets was justified.

7. A fairer pay gap between top and bottom (Financial Times)

Capitalism at its best is the most reliable generator of wealth we know, writes Will Hutton, as his interim report on fairness in public-sector pay is published.

8. This self-serving coalition is ripping up our constitution (Daily Telegraph)

The Lib Dems' determination to end collective responsibility in the cabinet will end in chaos, argues Simon Heffer.

9. Iran's isolation (Times) (£)

The most important WikiLeaks disclosure is of the consensus that opposes Tehran's nuclear adventurism, says this leading article.

10. Tehran's hubris may now know no bounds (Financial Times)

Iranian leaders have been given a copy of their opponents' playbook, writes Suzanne Maloney.

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