Follow that rabbit, Monsieur Sarkozy!

Despite all the gloom, there’s still humour to be found in the WikiLeaks revelations.

As the WikiLeaks storm continues, much focus is on the negative aspects of such a colossal breach of security. Secret cables revealing human rights abuses or the possibility of violence in North Korea (to give two examples) reinforce the narrative that the whole world is a dreadful place teetering on the brink of chaos.

Why can't we just, for once, enjoy the ridiculous and the absurd? Thanks to the French president, Nicolas Sarkozy – subject of a number of US embassy cables – we can. The revelations range from the mundane (the Saudis thought he was badly mannered) to the sinister (he apparently was an authoritarian who struck fear into his own advisers). One cable, however, that stood out above all the others was the despatch that featured this passage:

Sarkozy was clearly happy – and proud – to be in the company of his young son [Louis] and seemed tickled to be able to introduce him to "the ambassador of the United States". Louis appeared at the threshold with a small dog at his feet and a large rabbit in his arms. To shake hands with the ambassador, Louis put down the rabbit – and the dog started chasing the rabbit through Sarkozy's office, which led to the unforgettable sight of Sarkozy, bent over, chasing the dog through the anteroom to his office as the dog chased the rabbit.

Is that not the most ludicrously amusing image? You can practically hear the music of Benny Hill accompanying such a fiasco. "Allons-y, lapin!"

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Could Jeremy Corbyn still be excluded from the leadership race? The High Court will rule today

Labour donor Michael Foster has applied for a judgement. 

If you thought Labour's National Executive Committee's decision to let Jeremy Corbyn automatically run again for leader was the end of it, think again. 

Today, the High Court will decide whether the NEC made the right judgement - or if Corbyn should have been forced to seek nominations from 51 MPs, which would effectively block him from the ballot.

The legal challenge is brought by Michael Foster, a Labour donor and former parliamentary candidate. Corbyn is listed as one of the defendants.

Before the NEC decision, both Corbyn's team and the rebel MPs sought legal advice.

Foster has maintained he is simply seeking the views of experts. 

Nevertheless, he has clashed with Corbyn before. He heckled the Labour leader, whose party has been racked with anti-Semitism scandals, at a Labour Friends of Israel event in September 2015, where he demanded: "Say the word Israel."

But should the judge decide in favour of Foster, would the Labour leadership challenge really be over?

Dr Peter Catterall, a reader in history at Westminster University and a specialist in opposition studies, doesn't think so. He said: "The Labour party is a private institution, so unless they are actually breaking the law, it seems to me it is about how you interpret the rules of the party."

Corbyn's bid to be personally mentioned on the ballot paper was a smart move, he said, and the High Court's decision is unlikely to heal wounds.

 "You have to ask yourself, what is the point of doing this? What does success look like?" he said. "Will it simply reinforce the idea that Mr Corbyn is being made a martyr by people who are out to get him?"